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Assessing Groundwater Depletion and Dynamics Using GRACE and InSAR: Potential and Limitations

Overview of attention for article published in Ground Water, August 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

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1 news outlet
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107 Dimensions

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263 Mendeley
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Title
Assessing Groundwater Depletion and Dynamics Using GRACE and InSAR: Potential and Limitations
Published in
Ground Water, August 2016
DOI 10.1111/gwat.12453
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pascal Castellazzi, Richard Martel, Devin L. Galloway, Laurent Longuevergne, Alfonso Rivera

Abstract

In the last decade, remote sensing of the temporal variation of ground level and gravity has improved our understanding of groundwater dynamics and storage. Mass changes are measured by GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites, whereas ground deformation is measured by processing synthetic aperture radar satellites data using the InSAR (Interferometry of Synthetic Aperture Radar) techniques. Both methods are complementary and offer different sensitivities to aquifer system processes. GRACE is sensitive to mass changes over large spatial scales (more than 100,000 km(2) ). As such, it fails in providing groundwater storage change estimates at local or regional scales relevant to most aquifer systems, and at which most groundwater management schemes are applied. However, InSAR measures ground displacement due to aquifer response to fluid-pressure changes. InSAR applications to groundwater depletion assessments are limited to aquifer systems susceptible to measurable deformation. Furthermore, the inversion of InSAR-derived displacement maps into volume of depleted groundwater storage (both reversible and largely irreversible) is confounded by vertical and horizontal variability of sediment compressibility. During the last decade, both techniques have shown increasing interest in the scientific community to complement available in situ observations where they are insufficient. In this review, we present the theoretical and conceptual bases of each method, and present idealized scenarios to highlight the potential benefits and challenges of combining these techniques to remotely assess groundwater storage changes and other aspects of the dynamics of aquifer systems.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 263 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 262 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 21%
Researcher 35 13%
Student > Master 31 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 5%
Student > Bachelor 13 5%
Other 37 14%
Unknown 77 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 89 34%
Engineering 38 14%
Environmental Science 30 11%
Computer Science 5 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 2%
Other 6 2%
Unknown 90 34%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,536,598
of 25,183,822 outputs
Outputs from Ground Water
#55
of 892 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,898
of 345,509 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ground Water
#3
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,183,822 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 892 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,509 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.