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Demographic mechanisms underpinning genetic assimilation of remnant groups of a large carnivore

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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Citations

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Title
Demographic mechanisms underpinning genetic assimilation of remnant groups of a large carnivore
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2016
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2016.1467
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nate Mikle, Tabitha A. Graves, Ryan Kovach, Katherine C. Kendall, Amy C. Macleod

Abstract

Current range expansions of large terrestrial carnivores are occurring following human-induced range contraction. Contractions are often incomplete, leaving small remnant groups in refugia throughout the former range. Little is known about the underlying ecological and evolutionary processes that influence how remnant groups are affected during range expansion. We used data from a spatially explicit, long-term genetic sampling effort of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE), USA, to identify the demographic processes underlying spatial and temporal patterns of genetic diversity. We conducted parentage analysis to evaluate how reproductive success and dispersal contribute to spatio-temporal patterns of genetic diversity in remnant groups of grizzly bears existing in the southwestern (SW), southeastern (SE) and east-central (EC) regions of the NCDE. A few reproductively dominant individuals and local inbreeding caused low genetic diversity in peripheral regions that may have persisted for multiple generations before eroding rapidly (approx. one generation) during population expansion. Our results highlight that individual-level genetic and reproductive dynamics play critical roles during genetic assimilation, and show that spatial patterns of genetic diversity on the leading edge of an expansion may result from historical demographic patterns that are highly ephemeral.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 35%
Student > Master 7 15%
Researcher 7 15%
Other 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 65%
Environmental Science 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Chemical Engineering 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 5 11%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2018.
All research outputs
#2,875,366
of 26,178,577 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#5,045
of 11,555 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,181
of 333,062 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#66
of 124 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,178,577 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,555 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 41.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,062 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 124 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.