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Interventions for treating constipation in pregnancy

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2001
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

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3 news outlets

Citations

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70 Dimensions
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Title
Interventions for treating constipation in pregnancy
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2001
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd001142
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Jewell, Gavin Young

Abstract

Constipation is a common problem in late pregnancy. Circulating progesterone may be the cause of slower gastrointestinal movement in mid and late pregnancy. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of different methods for treating constipation in pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and MEDLINE. Date of last search: January 2001. Randomised trials of any treatment for constipation in pregnancy. Trial quality assessments and data extraction were done independently by two reviewers. Two suitable trials were identified. Fibre supplements increased the frequency of defecation (odds ratio 0.18, 95% confidence interval 0.05 to 0.67), and lead to softer stools. Stimulant laxatives are more effective than bulk-forming laxatives (odds ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.14 to 0.61), but may cause more side effects. Dietary supplements of fibre in the form of bran or wheat fibre are likely to help women experiencing constipation in pregnancy. If the problem fails to resolve, stimulant laxatives are likely to prove more effective.

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2014.
All research outputs
#577,465
of 12,527,093 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#1,783
of 8,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,282
of 265,291 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#42
of 175 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,527,093 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,923 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,291 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 175 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.