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Heavy metals in wild rice from northern Wisconsin

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, February 2000
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

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1 blog
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1 X user

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Heavy metals in wild rice from northern Wisconsin
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, February 2000
DOI 10.1016/s0048-9697(99)00464-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

James P. Bennett, Esteban Chiriboga, John Coleman, Donald M. Waller

Abstract

Wild rice grain samples from various parts of the world have been found to have elevated concentrations of heavy metals, raising concern for potential effects on human health. It was hypothesized that wild rice from north-central Wisconsin could potentially have elevated concentrations of some heavy metals because of possible exposure to these elements from the atmosphere or from water and sediments. In addition, no studies of heavy metals in wild rice from Wisconsin had been performed, and a baseline study was needed for future comparisons. Wild rice plants were collected from four areas in Bayfield, Forest, Langlade, Oneida, Sawyer and Wood Counties in September, 1997 and 1998 and divided into four plant parts for elemental analyses: roots, stems, leaves and seeds. A total of 194 samples from 51 plants were analyzed across the localities, with an average of 49 samples per part depending on the element. Samples were cleaned of soil, wet digested, and analyzed by ICP for Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mg, Pb, Se and Zn. Roots contained the highest concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se. Copper was highest in both roots and seeds, while Zn was highest just in seeds. Magnesium was highest in leaves. Seed baseline ranges for the 10 elements were established using the 95% confidence intervals of the medians. Wild rice plants from northern Wisconsin had normal levels of the nutritional elements Cu, Mg and Zn in the seeds. Silver, Cd, Hg, Cr, and Se were very low in concentration or within normal limits for food plants. Arsenic and Pb, however, were elevated and could pose a problem for human health. The pathway for As, Hg and Pb to the plants could be atmospheric.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Philippines 1 1%
India 1 1%
Unknown 64 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 18%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 9%
Student > Master 6 9%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 16 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 21 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 21 31%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2021.
All research outputs
#2,864,122
of 25,374,917 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#3,837
of 29,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,377
of 111,363 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#2
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,374,917 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 29,625 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 111,363 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.