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Myocarditis and myopericarditis cases following COVID-19 mRNA vaccines administered to 12–17-year olds in Victoria, Australia

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Paediatrics Open, June 2022
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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32 X users

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
Myocarditis and myopericarditis cases following COVID-19 mRNA vaccines administered to 12–17-year olds in Victoria, Australia
Published in
BMJ Paediatrics Open, June 2022
DOI 10.1136/bmjpo-2022-001472
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daryl R Cheng, Hazel J Clothier, Hannah J Morgan, Emma Roney, Priya Shenton, Nicholas Cox, Bryn O Jones, Silja Schrader, Nigel W Crawford, Jim P Buttery, Greta Goldsmith, Samar Hikmat, Josh Osowicki, Linny Phuong, Mel Addison, Louise Dempsey, Adele Harris, Georgie Lewis, Bianca Penak, Laura Voss, Jaimee Craft, Victoria Scott, Lois Tham, Anna Power, Ngaree Blow, Elise Virah Sawmy, Eleanor Duckworth, Michelle Wolthuizen, Naveen Tenneti, Nick White, Melodie Heland, Sally Gordon, Jane Standish, Kathleen McCloskey, Brooke Doherty, Catie Fleming, Jeremy Carr, Matthew O’Brien, Paxton Loke, Ciara Earley, David Tran, Shane O’Dea, Lianne Cox, Yoko Asakawa, Teresa Lazzaro, Kirsten Perrett, Shidan Tosif, Wonie Uahwatanasakul

Abstract

COVID-19 mRNA vaccine-associated myocarditis has previously been described; however specific features in the adolescent population are currently not well understood. To describe myocarditis adverse events following immunisation reported following any COVID-19 mRNA vaccines in the adolescent population in Victoria, Australia. Statewide, population-based study. Surveillance of Adverse Events Following Vaccination in the Community (SAEFVIC) is the vaccine-safety service for Victoria, Australia. All SAEFVIC reports of myocarditis and myopericarditis in 12-17-year-old COVID-19 mRNA vaccinees submitted between 22 February 2021 and 22 February 2022, as well as accompanying diagnostic investigation results where available, were assessed using Brighton Collaboration criteria for diagnostic certainty. Any mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. Confirmed myocarditis as per Brighton Collaboration criteria (levels 1-3). Clinical review demonstrated definitive (Brighton level 1) or probable (level 2) diagnoses in 75 cases. Confirmed myocarditis reporting rates were 8.3 per 100 000 doses in this age group. Cases were predominantly male (n=62, 82.7%) and post dose 2 (n=61, 81.3%). Rates peaked in the 16-17-year-old age group and were higher in males than females (17.7 vs 3.9 per 100 000, p=<0.001).The most common presenting symptoms were chest pain, dyspnoea and palpitations. A large majority of cases who had a cardiac MRI had abnormalities (n=33, 91.7%). Females were more likely to have ongoing clinical symptoms at 1-month follow-up (p=0.02). Accurate evaluation and confirmation of episodes of COVID-19 mRNA vaccine-associated myocarditis enabled understanding of clinical phenotypes in the adolescent age group. Any potential vaccination and safety surveillance policies needs to consider age and gender differences.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
As of 1 July 2024, you may notice a temporary increase in the numbers of X profiles with Unknown location. Click here to learn more.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 17%
Other 2 11%
Professor 1 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 9 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 17%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Chemical Engineering 1 6%
Unknown 9 50%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2024.
All research outputs
#1,310,882
of 26,238,332 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Paediatrics Open
#67
of 739 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,496
of 446,316 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Paediatrics Open
#3
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,238,332 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 739 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 446,316 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.