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Winter climate change and coastal wetland foundation species: salt marshes vs. mangrove forests in the southeastern United States

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
1 X user

Citations

dimensions_citation
309 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
426 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Winter climate change and coastal wetland foundation species: salt marshes vs. mangrove forests in the southeastern United States
Published in
Global Change Biology, February 2013
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12126
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael J. Osland, Nicholas Enwright, Richard H. Day, Thomas W. Doyle

Abstract

We live in an era of unprecedented ecological change in which ecologists and natural resource managers are increasingly challenged to anticipate and prepare for the ecological effects of future global change. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of winter climate change upon salt marsh and mangrove forest foundation species in the southeastern United States. Our research addresses the following three questions: (1) What is the relationship between winter climate and the presence and abundance of mangrove forests relative to salt marshes; (2) How vulnerable are salt marshes to winter climate change-induced mangrove forest range expansion; and (3) What is the potential future distribution and relative abundance of mangrove forests under alternative winter climate change scenarios? We developed simple winter climate-based models to predict mangrove forest distribution and relative abundance using observed winter temperature data (1970-2000) and mangrove forest and salt marsh habitat data. Our results identify winter climate thresholds for salt marsh-mangrove forest interactions and highlight coastal areas in the southeastern United States (e.g., Texas, Louisiana, and parts of Florida) where relatively small changes in the intensity and frequency of extreme winter events could cause relatively dramatic landscape-scale ecosystem structural and functional change in the form of poleward mangrove forest migration and salt marsh displacement. The ecological implications of these marsh-to-mangrove forest conversions are poorly understood, but would likely include changes for associated fish and wildlife populations and for the supply of some ecosystem goods and services.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 426 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 414 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 77 18%
Researcher 68 16%
Student > Master 62 15%
Student > Bachelor 35 8%
Professor 23 5%
Other 72 17%
Unknown 89 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 132 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 104 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 38 9%
Engineering 10 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 2%
Other 31 7%
Unknown 104 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2019.
All research outputs
#2,022,744
of 24,829,155 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#2,558
of 6,174 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,479
of 299,160 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#33
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,829,155 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,174 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,160 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.