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Maternal androgens in avian brood parasites and their hosts: Responses to parasitism and competition?

Overview of attention for article published in General & Comparative Endocrinology, October 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Maternal androgens in avian brood parasites and their hosts: Responses to parasitism and competition?
Published in
General & Comparative Endocrinology, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ygcen.2016.10.004
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. Caldwell Hahn, John C. Wingfield, David M. Fox, Brian G. Walker, Jill E. Thomley

Abstract

In the coevolutionary dynamic of avian brood parasites and their hosts, maternal (or transgenerational) effects have rarely been investigated. We examined the potential role of elevated yolk testosterone in eggs of the principal brood parasite in North America, the brown-headed cowbird, and three of its frequent host species. Elevated maternal androgens in eggs are a common maternal effect observed in many avian species when breeding conditions are unfavorable. These steroids accelerate embryo development, shorten incubation period, increase nestling growth rate, and enhance begging vigor, all traits that can increase the survival of offspring. We hypothesized that elevated maternal androgens in host eggs are a defense against brood parasitism. Our second hypothesis was that elevated maternal androgens in cowbird eggs are a defense against intra-specific competition. For host species, we found that elevated yolk testosterone was correlated with parasitized nests of small species, those whose nest success is most reduced by cowbird parasitism. For cowbirds, we found that elevated yolk testosterone was correlated with eggs in multiply-parasitized nests, which indicate intra-specific competition for nests due to high cowbird density. We propose experimental work to further examine the use of maternal effects by cowbirds and their hosts.

X Demographics

X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Master 5 16%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Professor 3 10%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 52%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Chemistry 2 6%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2016.
All research outputs
#8,804,323
of 26,178,577 outputs
Outputs from General & Comparative Endocrinology
#401
of 1,929 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,586
of 328,420 outputs
Outputs of similar age from General & Comparative Endocrinology
#5
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,178,577 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 66th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,929 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 328,420 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.