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In-Reservoir Physical Processes Modulate Aqueous and Biological Methylmercury Export from a Seasonally Anoxic Reservoir

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, September 2022
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Title
In-Reservoir Physical Processes Modulate Aqueous and Biological Methylmercury Export from a Seasonally Anoxic Reservoir
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, September 2022
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.2c03958
Pubmed ID
Authors

Austin K. Baldwin, Collin A. Eagles-Smith, James J. Willacker, Brett A. Poulin, David P. Krabbenhoft, Jesse Naymik, Michael T. Tate, Dain Bates, Nick Gastelecutto, Charles Hoovestol, Chris Larsen, Alysa M. Yoder, James Chandler, Ralph Myers

Abstract

Anoxic conditions within reservoirs related to thermal stratification and oxygen depletion lead to methylmercury (MeHg) production, a key process governing the uptake of mercury in aquatic food webs. Once formed within a reservoir, the timing and magnitude of the biological uptake of MeHg and the relative importance of MeHg export in water versus biological compartments remain poorly understood. We examined the relations between the reservoir stratification state, anoxia, and the concentrations and export loads of MeHg in aqueous and biological compartments at the outflow locations of two reservoirs of the Hells Canyon Complex (Snake River, Idaho-Oregon). Results show that (1) MeHg concentrations in filter-passing water, zooplankton, suspended particles, and detritus increased in response to reservoir destratification; (2) zooplankton MeHg strongly correlated with MeHg in filter-passing water during destratification; (3) reservoir anoxia appeared to be a key control on MeHg export; and (4) biological MeHg, primarily in zooplankton, accounted for only 5% of total MeHg export from the reservoirs (the remainder being aqueous compartments). These results improve our understanding of the role of biological incorporation of MeHg and the subsequent downstream release from seasonally stratified reservoirs and demonstrate that in-reservoir physical processes strongly influence MeHg incorporation at the base of the aquatic food web.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 18%
Unspecified 1 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Unknown 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 3 27%
Unspecified 1 9%
Chemistry 1 9%
Unknown 6 55%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2023.
All research outputs
#8,922,452
of 26,314,361 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#10,107
of 21,629 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,878
of 438,263 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#149
of 297 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,314,361 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 21,629 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.0. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 438,263 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 297 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.