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Isolating effects of moral injury and low post-deployment support within the U.S. military

Overview of attention for article published in Psychiatry Research, November 2016
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Title
Isolating effects of moral injury and low post-deployment support within the U.S. military
Published in
Psychiatry Research, November 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.11.031
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire Houtsma, Lauren R. Khazem, Bradley A. Green, Michael D. Anestis

Abstract

Suicide rates within U.S. military components, particularly the National Guard, are significantly higher than the general population suicide rate. To better understand and prevent suicide within this population, we must identify mechanisms of risk contributing to these discrepancies. One risk factor relevant to military service is moral injury, a term for experiences that violate one's moral beliefs. Using a series of hierarchical multiple regressions, the current study examined the moderating role of post-deployment social support on the association between moral injury (self-transgressions, other-transgressions, and betrayal) and thwarted belongingness among military personnel. The current sample was comprised of 552 military personnel with at least one previous deployment. Partially consistent with hypotheses, results revealed that other-transgressions and betrayal were significantly associated with thwarted belongingness at low, but not mean or high levels of post-deployment support. In contrast, the interaction of self-transgressions and post-deployment support was not significantly associated with thwarted belongingness, nor was there a significant main effect of self-transgressions on thwarted belongingness. This suggests that experiencing other-perpetrated morally injurious events (i.e., watching a fellow soldier die, being betrayed by a comrade) can be compounded by low post-deployment social support, increasing risk for thwarted belongingness. Implications for prevention and treatment are discussed.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 15%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Master 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 4%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 16 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 26 35%
Social Sciences 11 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 18 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 November 2016.
All research outputs
#16,721,208
of 25,373,627 outputs
Outputs from Psychiatry Research
#4,568
of 7,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#250,117
of 417,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychiatry Research
#91
of 163 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,373,627 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,587 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 417,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 163 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.