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Ethical concerns when recruiting children with cancer for research: Swedish healthcare professionals’ perceptions and experiences

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Ethics, March 2023
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
3 blogs
twitter
13 X users

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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21 Mendeley
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Title
Ethical concerns when recruiting children with cancer for research: Swedish healthcare professionals’ perceptions and experiences
Published in
BMC Medical Ethics, March 2023
DOI 10.1186/s12910-023-00901-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kajsa Norbäck, Anna T. Höglund, Tove Godskesen, Sara Frygner-Holm

Abstract

Research is crucial to improve treatment, survival and quality of life for children with cancer. However, recruitment of children for research raises ethical challenges. The aim of this study was to explore and describe ethical values and challenges related to the recruitment of children with cancer for research, from the perspectives and experiences of healthcare professionals in the Swedish context. Another aim was to explore their perceptions of research ethics competence in recruiting children for research. An explorative qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with key informants. Seven physicians and ten nurses were interviewed. Interviews were analysed using inductive qualitative content analysis. The respondents' ethical challenges and values in recruitment mainly concerned establishing relationships and trust, meeting informational needs, acknowledging vulnerability, and balancing roles and interests. Ensuring ethical competence was raised as important, and interpersonal and communicative skills were highlighted. This study provides empirical insight into recruitment of children with cancer, from the perspectives of healthcare professionals. It also contributes to the understanding of recruitment as a relational process, where aspects of vulnerability, trust and relationship building are important, alongside meeting informational needs. The results provide knowledge on the complexities raised by paediatric research and underpin the importance of building research ethics competence to ensure that the rights and interests of children with cancer are protected in research.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Student > Postgraduate 1 5%
Unknown 16 76%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Mathematics 1 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Unknown 16 76%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2023.
All research outputs
#1,422,204
of 24,597,084 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Ethics
#108
of 1,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,023
of 411,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Ethics
#4
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,597,084 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,060 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 411,587 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.