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Effects of repetitive head trauma on symptomatology of subsequent sport-related concussion.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, May 2023
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 1,690)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

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29 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
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2 X users

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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11 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of repetitive head trauma on symptomatology of subsequent sport-related concussion.
Published in
Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, May 2023
DOI 10.3171/2023.2.peds237
Pubmed ID
Authors

Addison Quinones, Tirone Young, Alexander J Schupper, Muhammad Ali, Eugene I Hrabarchuk, Colin D Lamb, Lisa Genadry, Roshini Kalagara, Zerubabbel K Asfaw, Alex Gometz, Mark Lovell, Tanvir F Choudhri

Abstract

Adolescent participation in athletics continues to grow, leading to an increasing incidence of sports-related concussion (SRC). The current literature suggests that a greater number of prior concussions positively correlates with a greater number of total symptoms, but the specific concussion-related symptoms are not as well defined. The current study investigated the effects of prior recurrent head injury on the symptom profiles of student-athletes after another suspected concussion. A multicenter database consisting of 25,815 Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) results was filtered for student-athletes aged 12-22 years old who competed in 21 different sports. Patients were separated into 2 cohorts: athletes reporting a single prior concussion (SRC1) and athletes reporting 2 or more prior concussions (SRC2+). Comparisons were assessed for differences in 22 symptoms and 4 symptom clusters at baseline, first postinjury test (PI1), and second postinjury test (PI2) by using univariate and multivariate analyses. No differences were seen between SRC1 (n = 2253) and SRC2+ (n = 976) at baseline. At PI1, the SRC2+ group (n = 286) had lower severity of headaches (p = 0.04) but increased nervousness (p = 0.042), irritability (p = 0.028), sadness (p = 0.028), visual problems (p = 0.04), and neuropsychiatric symptoms (p = 0.009) compared with SRC1 (n = 529). Multivariate analysis revealed decreased headache severity with increased prior concussion (β = -0.27,95% CI -0.45 to -0.09, p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis at PI2 demonstrated the SRC2+ cohort (n = 130) had increased cognitive (β = 1.22, 95% CI 0.27-2.18, p = 0.012), sleep (β = 0.63, 95% CI 0.17-1.08, p = 0.007), and neuropsychiatric (β = 0.67,95% CI 0.14-1.2,0.014) symptoms compared with SRC1 (n = 292). At longitudinal follow-up, patients with a history of recurrent concussions reported greater symptom burden in cognitive, sleep, and neuropsychiatric symptom clusters but not migraine symptoms. This is an important distinction because migraine symptoms are often more easily distinguishable to patients, parents, and physicians. Careful assessment of specific symptoms should be considered in patients with a history of recurrent head injury prior to return to play.

X Demographics

X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Unknown 5 45%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Sports and Recreations 1 9%
Psychology 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 45%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 221. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2024.
All research outputs
#181,794
of 26,173,059 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics
#4
of 1,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,501
of 409,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics
#1
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,173,059 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,690 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 409,502 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.