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A life cycle database for parasitic acanthocephalans, cestodes, and nematodes

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
A life cycle database for parasitic acanthocephalans, cestodes, and nematodes
Published in
Ecology, March 2017
DOI 10.1002/ecy.1680
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel P. Benesh, Kevin D. Lafferty, Armand Kuris

Abstract

Parasitologists have worked out many complex life cycles over the last ~150 years, yet there have been few efforts to synthesize this information to facilitate comparisons among taxa. Most existing host-parasite databases focus on particular host taxa, do not distinguish final from intermediate hosts, and lack parasite life-history information. We summarized the known life cycles of trophically transmitted parasitic acanthocephalans, cestodes, and nematodes. For 973 parasite species, we gathered information from the literature on the hosts infected at each stage of the parasite life cycle (8510 host-parasite species associations), what parasite stage is in each host, and whether parasites need to infect certain hosts to complete the life cycle. We also collected life-history data for these parasites at each life cycle stage, including 2313 development time measurements and 7660 body size measurements. The result is the most comprehensive data summary available for these parasite taxa. In addition to identifying gaps in our knowledge of parasite life cycles, these data can be used to test hypotheses about life cycle evolution, host specificity, parasite life-history strategies, and the roles of parasites in food webs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 31%
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Master 6 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Lecturer 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 61%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 11%
Environmental Science 3 8%
Engineering 1 3%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2018.
All research outputs
#3,011,497
of 18,812,015 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#1,554
of 6,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,666
of 400,974 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#30
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,812,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,319 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 400,974 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.