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Reservoir Competence of Native North American Birds for the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Entomology, May 2005
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Title
Reservoir Competence of Native North American Birds for the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi
Published in
Journal of Medical Entomology, May 2005
DOI 10.1093/jmedent/42.3.445
Pubmed ID
Authors

Howard S. Ginsberg, P. A. Buckley, Maxon G. Balmforth, Elyes Zhioua, Shaibal Mitra, Francine G. Buckley

Abstract

Reservoir competence for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was tested for six species of native North American birds: American robin, gray catbird, brown thrasher, eastern towhee, song sparrow, and northern cardinal. Wild birds collected by mist netting on Fire Island, NY, were held in a field laboratory in cages over water and locally collected larval ticks were placed on the birds, harvested from the water after engorgement, and tested for infection by direct fluorescentantibody staining after molting to the nymphal stage. American robins were competent reservoirs, infecting 16.1% of larvae applied to wild-caught birds, compared with 0% of control ticks placed on uninfected laboratory mice. Robins that were previously infected in the laboratory by nymphal feeding infected 81.8% of applied larvae. Wild-caught song sparrows infected 4.8% of applied larvae and 21.1% when infected by nymphal feeding. Results suggest moderate levels of reservoir competence for northern cardinals, lower levels for gray catbirds, and little evidence of reservoir competence for eastern towhees or brown thrashers. Lower infection rates in larvae applied to wild-caught birds compared with birds infected in the laboratory suggest that infected birds display temporal variability in infectiousness to larval ticks. Engorged larvae drop from birds abundantly during daylight, so the abundance of these bird species in the peridomestic environment suggests that they might contribute infected ticks to lawns and gardens.

Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 58 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 17%
Student > Master 8 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Other 14 24%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 47%
Environmental Science 7 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Unspecified 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 13 22%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2012.
All research outputs
#8,557,665
of 25,432,721 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Entomology
#1,063
of 3,271 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,566
of 70,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Entomology
#9
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,432,721 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,271 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.5. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 70,177 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.