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Psychological Effects of a 1-Month Meditation Retreat on Experienced Meditators: The Role of Non-attachment

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Psychology, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
26 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
158 Mendeley
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Title
Psychological Effects of a 1-Month Meditation Retreat on Experienced Meditators: The Role of Non-attachment
Published in
Frontiers in Psychology, December 2016
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01935
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jesus Montero-Marin, Marta Puebla-Guedea, Paola Herrera-Mercadal, Ausias Cebolla, Joaquim Soler, Marcelo Demarzo, Carmelo Vazquez, Fernando Rodríguez-Bornaetxea, Javier García-Campayo

Abstract

Background: There are few studies devoted to assessing the impact of meditation-intensive retreats on the well-being, positive psychology, and personality of experienced meditators. We aimed to assess whether a 1-month Vipassana retreat: (a) would increase mindfulness and well-being; (b) would increase prosocial personality traits; and (c) whether psychological changes would be mediated and/or moderated by non-attachment. Method: A controlled, non-randomized, pre-post-intervention trial was used. The intervention group was a convenience sample (n = 19) of experienced meditators who participated in a 1-month Vipassana meditation retreat. The control group (n = 19) comprised matched experienced meditators who did not take part in the retreat. During the retreat, the mean duration of daily practice was 8-9 h, the diet was vegetarian and silence was compulsory. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ), Non-attachment Scale (NAS), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), Temperament Character Inventory Revised (TCI-R-67), Five Facets Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Self-Other Four Immeasurables (SOFI) and the MINDSENS Composite Index were administered. ANCOVAs and linear regression models were used to assess pre-post changes and mediation/moderation effects. Results: Compared to controls, retreatants showed increases in non-attachment, observing, MINDSENS, positive-affect, balance-affect, and cooperativeness; and decreases in describing, negative-others, reward-dependence and self-directedness. Non-attachment had a mediating role in decentring, acting aware, non-reactivity, negative-affect, balance-affect and self-directedness; and a moderating role in describing and positive others, with both mediating and moderating effects on satisfaction with life. Conclusions: A 1-month Vipassana meditation retreat seems to yield improvements in mindfulness, well-being, and personality, even in experienced meditators. Non-attachment might facilitate psychological improvements of meditation, making it possible to overcome possible ceiling effects ascribed to non-intensive practices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 157 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 16%
Student > Master 25 16%
Researcher 18 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 9%
Student > Postgraduate 12 8%
Other 39 25%
Unknown 24 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 70 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 9%
Social Sciences 8 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 5%
Neuroscience 6 4%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 34 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2020.
All research outputs
#1,061,189
of 17,609,679 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Psychology
#1,937
of 18,127 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,453
of 395,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Psychology
#205
of 1,608 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,609,679 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 18,127 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 395,276 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,608 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.