↓ Skip to main content

Heme Iron from Meat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-analysis and a Review of the Mechanisms Involved

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Prevention Research, February 2011
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 1,318)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
98 tweeters
patent
12 patents
facebook
6 Facebook pages
wikipedia
8 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
6 Google+ users
video
12 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
259 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
376 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Heme Iron from Meat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-analysis and a Review of the Mechanisms Involved
Published in
Cancer Prevention Research, February 2011
DOI 10.1158/1940-6207.capr-10-0113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nadia M. Bastide, Fabrice H.F. Pierre, Denis E. Corpet

Abstract

Red meat and processed meat intake is associated with a risk of colorectal cancer, a major cause of death in affluent countries. Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that heme iron present in meat promotes colorectal cancer. This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies of colon cancer reporting heme intake included 566,607 individuals and 4,734 cases of colon cancer. The relative risk of colon cancer was 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06-1.32) for subjects in the highest category of heme iron intake compared with those in the lowest category. Epidemiological data thus show a suggestive association between dietary heme and risk of colon cancer. The analysis of experimental studies in rats with chemically-induced colon cancer showed that dietary hemoglobin and red meat consistently promote aberrant crypt foci, a putative precancer lesion. The mechanism is not known, but heme iron has a catalytic effect on (i) the endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and (ii) the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic aldehydes by lipoperoxidation. A review of evidence supporting these hypotheses suggests that both pathways are involved in heme iron toxicity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 98 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 376 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Bulgaria 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 372 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 80 21%
Student > Master 62 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 13%
Researcher 40 11%
Student > Postgraduate 22 6%
Other 60 16%
Unknown 64 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 81 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 70 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 41 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 8%
Chemistry 13 3%
Other 61 16%
Unknown 81 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 185. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2022.
All research outputs
#162,683
of 21,756,717 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Prevention Research
#26
of 1,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,052
of 176,378 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Prevention Research
#2
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,756,717 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,318 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 176,378 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.