↓ Skip to main content

An automated training paradigm reveals long-term memory in planarians and its persistence through head regeneration

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Biology, October 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#15 of 7,488)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
363 tweeters
facebook
32 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
16 Google+ users
reddit
6 Redditors
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
259 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
An automated training paradigm reveals long-term memory in planarians and its persistence through head regeneration
Published in
Journal of Experimental Biology, October 2013
DOI 10.1242/jeb.087809
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tal Shomrat, Michael Levin

Abstract

Planarian flatworms are a popular system for research into the molecular mechanisms that enable these complex organisms to regenerate their entire body, including the brain. Classical data suggest that they may also be capable of long-term memory. Thus, the planarian system may offer the unique opportunity to study brain regeneration and memory in the same animal. To establish a system for the investigation of the dynamics of memory in a regenerating brain, we developed a computerized training and testing paradigm that avoided the many issues that confounded previous, manual attempts to train planarians. We then used this new system to train flatworms in an environmental familiarization protocol. We show that worms exhibit environmental familiarization, and that this memory persists for at least 14 days - long enough for the brain to regenerate. We further show that trained, decapitated planarians exhibit evidence of memory retrieval in a savings paradigm after regenerating a new head. Our work establishes a foundation for objective, high-throughput assays in this molecularly tractable model system that will shed light on the fundamental interface between body patterning and stored memories. We propose planarians as key emerging model species for mechanistic investigations of the encoding of specific memories in biological tissues. Moreover, this system is lik ely to have important implications for the biomedicine of stem-cell-derived treatments of degenerative brain disorders in human adults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 363 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 259 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 1%
Portugal 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Other 6 2%
Unknown 239 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 67 26%
Student > Bachelor 42 16%
Researcher 40 15%
Student > Master 29 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 18 7%
Other 38 15%
Unknown 25 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 114 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 32 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 8%
Psychology 16 6%
Neuroscience 14 5%
Other 33 13%
Unknown 30 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 493. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2021.
All research outputs
#28,241
of 17,669,649 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Biology
#15
of 7,488 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170
of 164,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Biology
#1
of 129 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,669,649 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,488 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,475 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 129 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.