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Sulfolobus islandicus meta-populations in Yellowstone National Park hot springs

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Microbiology, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
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Title
Sulfolobus islandicus meta-populations in Yellowstone National Park hot springs
Published in
Environmental Microbiology, June 2017
DOI 10.1111/1462-2920.13728
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kate M. Campbell, Angela Kouris, Whitney England, Rika E. Anderson, R. Blaine McCleskey, D. Kirk Nordstrom, Rachel J. Whitaker

Abstract

Abiotic and biotic forces shape the structure and evolution of microbial populations. We investigated forces that shape the spatial and temporal population structure of Sulfolobus islandicus by comparing geochemical and molecular analysis from seven hot springs in five regions sampled over three years in Yellowstone National Park. Through deep amplicon sequencing, we uncovered 148 unique alleles at two loci whose relative frequency provides clear evidence for independent populations in different hot springs. Although geography controls regional geochemical composition and population differentiation, temporal changes in population were not explained by corresponding variation in geochemistry. The data suggest that the influence of extinction, bottleneck events, and/or selective sweeps within a spring and low migration between springs shape these populations. We suggest that hydrologic events such as storm events and surface snowmelt runoff destabilize smaller hot spring environments with smaller populations and result in high variation in the S. islandicus population over time. Therefore, physical abiotic features such as hot spring size and position in the landscape are important factors shaping the stability and diversity of the S. islandicus meta-population within Yellowstone National Park. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
Unknown 11 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 33%
Researcher 3 25%
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Professor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 17%
Unspecified 1 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2017.
All research outputs
#1,665,606
of 12,348,046 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Microbiology
#590
of 2,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,661
of 260,537 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Microbiology
#48
of 143 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,348,046 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,625 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,537 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 143 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.