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The impact of voluntary food fortification on micronutrient intakes and status in European countries: a review

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
56 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
118 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of voluntary food fortification on micronutrient intakes and status in European countries: a review
Published in
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, September 2013
DOI 10.1017/s002966511300339x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Áine Hennessy, Janette Walton, Albert Flynn

Abstract

This review aims to assess the efficacy and safety of voluntary fortification as an option to address the occurrence of inadequate micronutrient intakes in population subgroups in Europe. Although legislation is harmonised across the European Union, fortification practices and patterns of consumption of fortified foods vary considerably between countries. While the proportion of children consuming fortified foods is greater than adults, the proportion of dietary energy obtained from fortified foods is generally low (<10% in Ireland, where fortified foods are widely consumed). There are a few systematic studies on the overall nutritional impact of voluntary fortification, but there are several studies on the impact of fortified ready-to-eat breakfast cereals. The available evidence indicates that voluntary fortification can reduce the risk of sub-optimal intakes of a range of micronutrients at a population level and can also improve status for selected micronutrients (e.g. folate, vitamin D and riboflavin) in children and adults. Although concerns have been raised regarding the potential of food fortification to lead to unacceptably high micronutrient intakes, particularly for those consuming higher amounts of fortified foods, data from national surveys on total micronutrient intakes (including fortified foods) in Europe show that small proportions of the population, particularly children, may exceed the upper intake level (UL) for some micronutrients. The risk of adverse effects occurring in these individuals exceeding the UL by modest amounts is low. In conclusion, voluntary fortification practices have been shown to improve intake and status of key micronutrients in European Union population groups and do not contribute appreciably to risk of adverse effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 118 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 26%
Student > Bachelor 21 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 13%
Researcher 11 9%
Other 10 8%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 12 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 10%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 17 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2021.
All research outputs
#5,585,113
of 20,850,533 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
#534
of 1,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,671
of 179,557 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,850,533 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,568 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 179,557 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.