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Persistence of historical population structure in an endangered species despite near‐complete biome conversion in California's San Joaquin Desert

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, May 2017
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Title
Persistence of historical population structure in an endangered species despite near‐complete biome conversion in California's San Joaquin Desert
Published in
Molecular Ecology, May 2017
DOI 10.1111/mec.14125
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan Q. Richmond, Dustin A. Wood, Michael F. Westphal, Amy G. Vandergast, Adam D. Leaché, Lawrence R. Saslaw, H. Scott Butterfield, Robert N. Fisher

Abstract

Genomic responses to habitat conversion can be rapid, providing wildlife managers with time-limited opportunities to enact recovery efforts that use population connectivity information that reflects pre-disturbance landscapes. Such opportunities may still exist for the endemic fauna and flora of California's San Joaquin Desert, where biome conversion is nearly complete, but comprehensive genetic datasets are lacking for nearly all species in the region. To fill this knowledge gap, we studied the rangewide population structure of the endangered blunt-nosed leopard lizard Gambelia sila, a San Joaquin Desert endemic, using restriction site associated DNA (RAD), microsatellite and mtDNA data to test whether admixture patterns and estimates of effective migration surfaces (EEMS) can identify land areas with high population connectivity prior to the conversion of native xeric habitats. Clustering and phylogenetic analyses indicate a recent shared history between numerous isolated populations and EEMS reveals latent signals of corridors and barriers to gene flow over areas now replaced by agriculture and urbanization. Conflicting histories between the mtDNA and nuclear genomes are consistent with hybridization with the sister species G. wislizenii, raising important questions about where legal protection should end at the southern range limit of G. sila. Comparative analysis of different data sets also adds to a growing list of advantages in using RAD loci for genetic studies of rare species. We demonstrate how the results of this work can serve as an evolutionary guidance tool for managing endemic, arid adapted taxa in one of the worlds most compromised landscapes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 74 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 27%
Student > Master 16 22%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 11 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 16%
Environmental Science 8 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 16 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2021.
All research outputs
#12,324,350
of 19,982,192 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#4,648
of 5,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,160
of 279,104 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#102
of 113 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,982,192 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,841 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,104 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 113 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.