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Tongue–palate contact during selected vowels in children with speech sound disorders

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, December 2013
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Tongue–palate contact during selected vowels in children with speech sound disorders
Published in
International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, December 2013
DOI 10.3109/17549507.2013.862857
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alice Lee, Fiona E. Gibbon, Elaine Kearney, Doris Murphy

Abstract

There is evidence that complete tongue-palate contact across the palate during production of vowels can be observed in some children with speech disorders associated with cleft palate in the English-speaking and Japanese-speaking populations. Although it has been shown that this is not a feature of typical vowel articulation in English-speaking adults, tongue-palate contact during vowel production in typical children and English-speaking children with speech sound disorders (SSD) have not been reported in detail. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether complete tongue-palate contact occurs during production of five selected vowels in 10 children with SSD and eight typically-developing children. The results showed that none of the typical children had complete contact across the palate during any of the vowels. However, of the 119 vowels produced by the children with SSD, 24% showed complete contact across the palate during at least a portion of the vowel segment. The results from the typically-developing children suggest that complete tongue-palate contact is an atypical articulatory feature. However, the evidence suggests that this pattern occurs relatively frequently in children with SSD. Further research is needed to determine the prevalence, cause, and perceptual consequence of complete tongue-palate contact.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 6 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 7 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Design 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2014.
All research outputs
#4,748,401
of 15,324,124 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
#285
of 525 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,730
of 262,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
#11
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,324,124 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 525 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,090 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.