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Causal mechanisms of soil organic matter decomposition: deconstructing salinity and flooding impacts in coastal wetlands

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, June 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

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1 news outlet
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4 X users

Citations

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72 Dimensions

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149 Mendeley
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Title
Causal mechanisms of soil organic matter decomposition: deconstructing salinity and flooding impacts in coastal wetlands
Published in
Ecology, June 2017
DOI 10.1002/ecy.1890
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camille L. Stagg, Donald R. Schoolmaster, Ken W. Krauss, Nicole Cormier, William H. Conner

Abstract

Coastal wetlands significantly contribute to global carbon storage potential. Sea-level rise and other climate change-induced disturbances threaten coastal wetland sustainability and carbon storage capacity. It is critical that we understand the mechanisms controlling wetland carbon loss so that we can predict and manage these resources in anticipation of climate change. However, our current understanding of the mechanisms that control soil organic matter decomposition, in particular the impacts of elevated salinity, are limited, and literature reports are contradictory. In an attempt to improve our understanding of these complex processes, we measured root and rhizome decomposition and developed a causal model to identify and quantify the mechanisms that influence soil organic matter decomposition in coastal wetlands that are impacted by sea-level rise. We identified three causal pathways: 1) a direct pathway representing the effects of flooding on soil moisture, 2) a direct pathway representing the effects of salinity on decomposer microbial communities and soil biogeochemistry, and 3) an indirect pathway representing the effects of salinity on litter quality through changes in plant community composition over time. We used this model to test the effects of alternate scenarios on the response of tidal freshwater forested wetlands and oligohaline marshes to short- and long-term climate-induced disturbances of flooding and salinity. In tidal freshwater forested wetlands, the model predicted less decomposition in response to drought, hurricane salinity pulsing, and long-term sea-level rise. In contrast, in the oligohaline marsh, the model predicted no change in response to sea-level rise, and increased decomposition following a drought or a hurricane salinity pulse. Our results show that it is critical to consider the temporal scale of disturbance and the magnitude of exposure when assessing the effects of salinity intrusion on carbon mineralization in coastal wetlands. Here we identify three causal mechanisms that can reconcile disparities between long-term and short-term salinity impacts on organic matter decomposition. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 149 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 19%
Researcher 26 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 7%
Other 8 5%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 37 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 55 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 6%
Engineering 5 3%
Social Sciences 3 2%
Other 10 7%
Unknown 41 28%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2020.
All research outputs
#2,797,110
of 22,971,207 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#1,416
of 6,562 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,709
of 315,436 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#24
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,971,207 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,562 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,436 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.