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The Origins of Ashkenaz, Ashkenazic Jews, and Yiddish

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Genetics, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#23 of 2,141)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
70 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
reddit
2 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
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Title
The Origins of Ashkenaz, Ashkenazic Jews, and Yiddish
Published in
Frontiers in Genetics, June 2017
DOI 10.3389/fgene.2017.00087
Pubmed ID
Authors

Das, Ranajit, Wexler, Paul, Pirooznia, Mehdi, Elhaik, Eran, Ranajit Das, Paul Wexler, Mehdi Pirooznia, Eran Elhaik

Abstract

Recently, the geographical origins of Ashkenazic Jews (AJs) and their native language Yiddish were investigated by applying the Geographic Population Structure (GPS) to a cohort of exclusively Yiddish-speaking and multilingual AJs. GPS localized most AJs along major ancient trade routes in northeastern Turkey adjacent to primeval villages with names that resemble the word "Ashkenaz." These findings were compatible with the hypothesis of an Irano-Turko-Slavic origin for AJs and a Slavic origin for Yiddish and at odds with the Rhineland hypothesis advocating a Levantine origin for AJs and German origins for Yiddish. We discuss how these findings advance three ongoing debates concerning (1) the historical meaning of the term "Ashkenaz;" (2) the genetic structure of AJs and their geographical origins as inferred from multiple studies employing both modern and ancient DNA and original ancient DNA analyses; and (3) the development of Yiddish. We provide additional validation to the non-Levantine origin of AJs using ancient DNA from the Near East and the Levant. Due to the rising popularity of geo-localization tools to address questions of origin, we briefly discuss the advantages and limitations of popular tools with focus on the GPS approach. Our results reinforce the non-Levantine origins of AJs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 70 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 38%
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Professor 1 8%
Lecturer 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 62%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 23%
Unspecified 1 8%
Psychology 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 61. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2018.
All research outputs
#208,072
of 11,498,576 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Genetics
#23
of 2,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,336
of 264,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Genetics
#1
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,498,576 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,141 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,185 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.