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A natural solution for obesity: Bioactives for the prevention and treatment of weight gain. A review

Overview of attention for article published in Nutritional Neuroscience, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 X users
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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124 Dimensions

Readers on

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235 Mendeley
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Title
A natural solution for obesity: Bioactives for the prevention and treatment of weight gain. A review
Published in
Nutritional Neuroscience, January 2014
DOI 10.1179/1476830513y.0000000099
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cristina Torres-Fuentes, Harriët Schellekens, Timothy G. Dinan, John F. Cryan

Abstract

Objectives Obesity and obesity-related disorders are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide. In this review, we summarize the accumulating studies that have emerged in the last few decades demonstrating that bioactives from different natural sources could potentially have anti-obesity effects. Methods We carried out an extensive search of relevant literature from Pubmed, Web of Knowledge, and other online databases for studies where anti-obesity effects were shown by compounds from natural sources. Results Appetite suppression, lipid metabolism regulation, and increase of energy expenditure are the main mechanisms by which anti-obesity effects are exerted. Plants represent the most studied natural source of anti-obesity bioactives. Camellia sinensis is the most representative species exerting several anti-obesity effects. Moreover, probiotics (bacteria which bestow health benefit), such as strains of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus families, and certain prebiotics (non-viable food components that confers a health benefit on the host associated with modulation of the microbiota effects), such as insulin-type fructans, have also shown capability to combat obesity. Finally, compounds from animal sources, in particular bioactive peptides derived from milk-derived whey and casein protein digestion, high dietary calcium, and omega-3s polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) present in fish oils, have also shown potential anti-obesity effects. Discussion Several anti-obesity effects have been observed in different natural bioactives providing an interesting and potentially safer and more desirable treatment strategy for the development of anti-obesity functional or medical foods.

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X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 235 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 228 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 13%
Student > Master 31 13%
Researcher 26 11%
Student > Bachelor 25 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 6%
Other 43 18%
Unknown 65 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 6%
Chemistry 8 3%
Other 44 19%
Unknown 78 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2023.
All research outputs
#2,625,047
of 23,952,093 outputs
Outputs from Nutritional Neuroscience
#219
of 815 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,059
of 311,557 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutritional Neuroscience
#11
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,952,093 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 815 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,557 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.