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Processed red meat contribution to dietary patterns and the associated cardio-metabolic outcomes

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Nutrition, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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25 tweeters
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4 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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98 Mendeley
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Title
Processed red meat contribution to dietary patterns and the associated cardio-metabolic outcomes
Published in
British Journal of Nutrition, August 2017
DOI 10.1017/s0007114517002008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yvonne M. Lenighan, Anne P. Nugent, Kaifeng F. Li, Lorraine Brennan, Janette Walton, Albert Flynn, Helen M. Roche, Breige A. McNulty

Abstract

Evidence suggests that processed red meat consumption is a risk factor for CVD and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This analysis investigates the association between dietary patterns, their processed red meat contributions, and association with blood biomarkers of CVD and T2D, in 786 Irish adults (18-90 years) using cross-sectional data from a 2011 national food consumption survey. All meat-containing foods consumed were assigned to four food groups (n 502) on the basis of whether they contained red or white meat and whether they were processed or unprocessed. The remaining foods (n 2050) were assigned to twenty-nine food groups. Two-step and k-means cluster analyses were applied to derive dietary patterns. Nutrient intakes, plasma fatty acids and biomarkers of CVD and T2D were assessed. A total of four dietary patterns were derived. In comparison with the pattern with lower contributions from processed red meat, the dietary pattern with greater processed red meat intakes presented a poorer Alternate Healthy Eating Index (21·2 (sd 7·7)), a greater proportion of smokers (29 %) and lower plasma EPA (1·34 (sd 0·72) %) and DHA (2·21 (sd 0·84) %) levels (P<0·001). There were no differences in classical biomarkers of CVD and T2D, including serum cholesterol and insulin, across dietary patterns. This suggests that the consideration of processed red meat consumption as a risk factor for CVD and T2D may need to be re-assessed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 98 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 17%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 8%
Student > Postgraduate 8 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 29 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 6%
Sports and Recreations 3 3%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 31 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2019.
All research outputs
#1,292,808
of 16,614,363 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Nutrition
#785
of 5,221 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,453
of 275,733 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Nutrition
#7
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,614,363 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,221 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,733 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.