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Microbiota and neurodevelopmental windows: implications for brain disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Molecular Medicine, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
24 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
696 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1496 Mendeley
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Title
Microbiota and neurodevelopmental windows: implications for brain disorders
Published in
Trends in Molecular Medicine, September 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.molmed.2014.05.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuliya E. Borre, Gerard W. O’Keeffe, Gerard Clarke, Catherine Stanton, Timothy G. Dinan, John F. Cryan

Abstract

Gut microbiota is essential to human health, playing a major role in the bidirectional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system. The microbiota undergoes a vigorous process of development throughout the lifespan and establishes its symbiotic rapport with the host early in life. Early life perturbations of the developing gut microbiota can impact neurodevelopment and potentially lead to adverse mental health outcomes later in life. This review compares the parallel early development of the intestinal microbiota and the nervous system. The concept of parallel and interacting microbial-neural critical windows opens new avenues for developing novel microbiota-modulating based therapeutic interventions in early life to combat neurodevelopmental deficits and brain disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,496 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 <1%
Spain 5 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Ireland 2 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Other 9 <1%
Unknown 1463 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 251 17%
Student > Master 239 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 214 14%
Researcher 195 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 79 5%
Other 255 17%
Unknown 263 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 270 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 251 17%
Neuroscience 177 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 156 10%
Psychology 82 5%
Other 240 16%
Unknown 320 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2021.
All research outputs
#790,460
of 22,381,487 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Molecular Medicine
#69
of 1,601 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,346
of 216,297 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Molecular Medicine
#4
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,381,487 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,601 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 216,297 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.