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Optimization of human, animal, and environmental health by using the One Health approach

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Veterinary Science, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#46 of 338)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
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Title
Optimization of human, animal, and environmental health by using the One Health approach
Published in
Journal of Veterinary Science, January 2017
DOI 10.4142/jvs.2017.18.s1.263
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan M. Sleeman, Thomas DeLiberto, Natalie Nguyen

Abstract

Emerging diseases are increasing burdens on public health, negatively affecting the world economy, causing extinction of species, and disrupting ecological integrity. One Health recognizes that human, domestic animal, and wildlife health are interconnected within ecosystem health and provides a framework for the development of multidisciplinary solutions to global health challenges. To date, most health-promoting interventions have focused largely on single-sector outcomes. For example, risk for transmission of zoonotic pathogens from bush-meat hunting is primarily focused on human hygiene and personal protection. However, bush-meat hunting is a complex issue promoting the need for holistic strategies to reduce transmission of zoonotic disease while addressing food security and wildlife conservation issues. Temporal and spatial separation of humans and wildlife, risk communication, and other preventative strategies should allow wildlife and humans to co-exist. Upstream surveillance, vaccination, and other tools to prevent pathogen spillover are also needed. Clear multi-sector outcomes should be defined, and a systems-based approach is needed to develop interventions that reduce risks and balance the needs of humans, wildlife, and the environment. The ultimate goal is long-term action to reduce forces driving emerging diseases and provide interdisciplinary scientific approaches to management of risks, thereby achieving optimal outcomes for human, animal, and environmental health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 18%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 7 11%
Other 4 7%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 28%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 8%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 17 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2021.
All research outputs
#5,421,805
of 17,838,103 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Veterinary Science
#46
of 338 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,731
of 280,380 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Veterinary Science
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,838,103 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 338 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,380 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them