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Serotonin, tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis

Overview of attention for article published in Behavioural Brain Research, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 4,696)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
77 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
41 tweeters
patent
2 patents
facebook
35 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users
video
8 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
1020 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
2484 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Serotonin, tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis
Published in
Behavioural Brain Research, January 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.bbr.2014.07.027
Pubmed ID
Authors

S.M. O’Mahony, G. Clarke, Y.E. Borre, T.G. Dinan, J.F. Cryan

Abstract

The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin functions as a key neurotransmitter at both terminals of this network. Accumulating evidence points to a critical role for the gut microbiome in regulating normal functioning of this axis. In particular, it is being clear that the microbial influence on tryptophan metabolism and the serotonergic system may be an important node in such regulation. There is also substantial overlap between behaviours influenced by the gut microbiota and those which rely on intact serotonergic neurotransmission. The developing serotonergic system may be vulnerable to a differential microbial colonisation patterns prior to the emergence of a stable adult-like gut microbiota. At the other extreme of life, the decreased diversity and stability of the gut microbiota may dictate serotonin-related health problems in the elderly. The mechanisms underpinning this crosstalk require further elaboration but may be related to the ability of the gut microbiota to control host tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway, thereby simultaneously reducing the fraction available for serotonin synthesis and increasing the production of neuroactive metabolites. The enzymes of this pathway are immune and stress-responsive, both systems which buttress the brain-gut axis. In addition, there are neural processes in the gastrointestinal tract which can be influenced by local alterations in serotonin concentrations with subsequent relay of signals along the scaffolding of the brain-gut axis to influence CNS neurotransmission. Therapeutic targeting of the gut microbiota might be a viable treatment strategy for serotonin-related brain-gut axis disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,484 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 <1%
Denmark 4 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
South Africa 3 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Other 11 <1%
Unknown 2446 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 547 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 364 15%
Student > Master 331 13%
Researcher 277 11%
Student > Postgraduate 132 5%
Other 399 16%
Unknown 434 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 432 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 380 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 328 13%
Neuroscience 207 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 139 6%
Other 476 19%
Unknown 522 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 705. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2022.
All research outputs
#23,177
of 22,586,107 outputs
Outputs from Behavioural Brain Research
#4
of 4,696 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214
of 348,561 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavioural Brain Research
#1
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,586,107 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,696 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,561 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.