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Stress in fathers in the perinatal period: A systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Midwifery, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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33 X users
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2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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110 Dimensions

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mendeley
246 Mendeley
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Title
Stress in fathers in the perinatal period: A systematic review
Published in
Midwifery, September 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2017.09.016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lloyd Frank Philpott, Patricia Leahy-Warren, Serena FitzGerald, Eileen Savage

Abstract

despite the evidence that fatherhood has a long-term positive and protective effect on men's health, there is also evidence that fatherhood in the perinatal period can be complex and demanding. Due to the potential increase in stressors in the perinatal period, there is reason to hypothesise that it is a time of increased stress for fathers. However, it is not clear how significant a problem stress is for fathers during this stage of life. This is in part, due to the fact that the available research has not been systematically reviewed. the purpose of this systematic review was to critically appraise the empirical evidence that examined stress in fathers in the perinatal period. systematic review. a systematic review protocol was developed and registered with PROSPERO (Reference number: CRD42016035821). The review was guided by the PRISMA reporting process. Electronic databases Medline, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collections were searched to identify studies that met the inclusion criteria. Studies that researched fathers in the perinatal period were included if stress was the principal focus of the research, if stress was in the title and/or aim of the study or if stress was an outcome or dependent variable. Data were extracted and presented in narrative form including tables and figures. eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The findings indicate that fathers experience stress in the perinatal period, particularly at the time of birth. Stress levels were found to increase from the antenatal period to the time of birth, with a decrease in stress levels from the time of birth to the later postnatal period. There are a number of factors that contribute to stress in fathers in the perinatal period and these included negative feelings about the pregnancy, role restrictions related to becoming a father, fear of childbirth and feelings of incompetence related to infant care. The review found that stress has a negative impact on fathers, with higher stress levels contributing to mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, psychological distress and fatigue. during the perinatal period fathers experience stress and face unique stressors that can impact negatively on their health and social relationships.

X Demographics

X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 246 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 246 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 37 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 12%
Researcher 26 11%
Student > Bachelor 23 9%
Other 12 5%
Other 37 15%
Unknown 81 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 49 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 44 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 31 13%
Social Sciences 13 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 1%
Other 18 7%
Unknown 88 36%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2023.
All research outputs
#1,135,385
of 26,362,953 outputs
Outputs from Midwifery
#112
of 2,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,026
of 330,506 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Midwifery
#4
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,362,953 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,277 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,506 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.