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Body Mass Index (BMI) and Cognitive Functions in Later Life.

Overview of attention for article published in Current Alzheimer Research, January 2018
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Title
Body Mass Index (BMI) and Cognitive Functions in Later Life.
Published in
Current Alzheimer Research, January 2018
DOI 10.2174/1567205014666171004114246
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yadollah A Momtaz, Sharifah A Haron, Tengku A Hamid, Rahimah Ibrahim, Parisa T Tanjani

Abstract

The findings from previous studies exploring the association between BMI and cognitive function in the elderly are conflicting. The purpose of the present study is twofold; to verify the association between BMI and cognitive functions and examine whether this association is impacted by height, when adjusted for possible covariates. The data for this study, consisted of 2287 older adults aged 60 years and above, drawn from a nationally representative population-based survey entitled "Determinants of Wellness among Older Malaysians: A Health Promotion Perspective" conducted in 2009. The mean age of the respondents was 68.7 (SD=6.6) years. The average score of cognitive function, measured by MMSE was 24.5 (SD=5.6). About 40% of the respondents were classified as overweight. Results of the multiple linear regression analysis revealed a significant association between BMI and cognitive function (Beta=.10, p<.001). The Factorial ANCOVA revealed significant interaction effect between BMI and height on cognitive function (F= 10.8, p<.001), after adjusting for possible covariates. The findings from the current study indicating the positive association between BMI and cognitive function depends on height, therefore it is suggested that short people might be targeted for dementia prevention.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Other 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 6%
Researcher 3 6%
Student > Master 3 6%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 20 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 22%
Psychology 6 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 4%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 22 43%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2017.
All research outputs
#17,292,294
of 25,382,440 outputs
Outputs from Current Alzheimer Research
#1,023
of 1,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#283,799
of 449,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Alzheimer Research
#54
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,382,440 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,177 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 449,550 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.