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Elemental composition of vegetables cultivated over coal-mining waste

Overview of attention for article published in Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, October 2017
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Title
Elemental composition of vegetables cultivated over coal-mining waste
Published in
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, October 2017
DOI 10.1590/0001-3765201720170234
Pubmed ID
Authors

JAIRO J. ZOCCHE, PAULA ROHR, ADRIANI P. DAMIANI, DANIELA D. LEFFA, MIRIAM C. MARTINS, CAROLINE M. ZOCCHE, KARINA O. TEIXEIRA, GABRIELA D. BORGES, MAIELLEN M. DE JESUS, CARLA E.I. DOS SANTOS, JOHNNY F. DIAS, VANESSA M. DE ANDRADE

Abstract

We assessed elemental composition of the liver in mice subjected to one-time or chronic consumption of the juice of vegetables cultivated in a vegetable garden built over deposits of coal waste. Lactuca sativa L. (lettuce), Beta vulgaris L. (beet), Brassica oleracea L. var. italica (broccoli) and Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala (kale) were collected from the coal-mining area and from a certified organic farm (control). Elemental composition was analyzed by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method. Concentrations of Mg, S, and Ca of mice subjected to one-time consumption of broccoli and concentrations of these same elements plus Si of mice receiving kale were higher in the coal-mining area. Concentrations of P, K, and Cu were increase after chronic consumption of lettuce from the coal-mining area, whereas the levels of Si, P, K, Fe, and Zn were higher in the group consuming kale from the coal-mining area. Our data suggests that people consuming vegetables grown over coal wastes may ingest significant amounts of chemical elements that pose a risk to health, since these plants contain both essential and toxic metals in a wide range of concentrations, which can do more harm than good.

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 20%
Professor 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Researcher 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Environmental Science 2 7%
Engineering 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Unknown 10 33%