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Should coastal planners have concern over where land ice is melting?

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 3,324)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
99 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
644 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
7 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
80 Mendeley
Title
Should coastal planners have concern over where land ice is melting?
Published in
Science Advances, November 2017
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1700537
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric Larour, Erik R. Ivins, Surendra Adhikari

Abstract

There is a general consensus among Earth scientists that melting of land ice greatly contributes to sea-level rise (SLR) and that future warming will exacerbate the risks posed to human civilization. As land ice is lost to the oceans, both the Earth's gravitational and rotational potentials are perturbed, resulting in strong spatial patterns in SLR, termed sea-level fingerprints. We lack robust forecasting models for future ice changes, which diminishes our ability to use these fingerprints to accurately predict local sea-level (LSL) changes. We exploit an advanced mathematical property of adjoint systems and determine the exact gradient of sea-level fingerprints with respect to local variations in the ice thickness of all of the world's ice drainage systems. By exhaustively mapping these fingerprint gradients, we form a new diagnosis tool, henceforth referred to as gradient fingerprint mapping (GFM), that readily allows for improved assessments of future coastal inundation or emergence. We demonstrate that for Antarctica and Greenland, changes in the predictions of inundation at major port cities depend on the location of the drainage system. For example, in London, GFM shows LSL that is significantly affected by changes on the western part of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), whereas in New York, LSL change predictions are greatly sensitive to changes in the northeastern portions of the GrIS. We apply GFM to 293 major port cities to allow coastal planners to readily calculate LSL change as more reliable predictions of cryospheric mass changes become available.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 644 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 80 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 20%
Unspecified 11 14%
Professor 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 18 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 34 43%
Unspecified 16 20%
Environmental Science 6 8%
Engineering 6 8%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Other 14 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1248. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2019.
All research outputs
#2,447
of 13,533,438 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#31
of 3,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120
of 309,964 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#3
of 178 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,533,438 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,324 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 122.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,964 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 178 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.