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Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in stress resilience

Overview of attention for article published in Neurobiology of Stress, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

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17 X users

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443 Mendeley
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Title
Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in stress resilience
Published in
Neurobiology of Stress, November 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.ynstr.2014.11.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brunno R. Levone, John F. Cryan, Olivia F. O'Leary

Abstract

There is a growing appreciation that adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in emotional and cognitive processes related to psychiatric disorders. Although many studies have investigated the effects of stress on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, most have not focused on whether stress-induced changes in neurogenesis occur specifically in animals that are more resilient or more susceptible to the behavioural and neuroendocrine effects of stress. Thus, in the present review we explore whether there is a clear relationship between stress-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, stress resilience and antidepressant-induced recovery from stress-induced changes in behaviour. Exposure to different stressors is known to reduce adult hippocampal neurogenesis, but some stressors have also been shown to exert opposite effects. Ablation of neurogenesis does not lead to a depressive phenotype, but it can enhance responsiveness to stress and affect stress susceptibility. Monoaminergic-targeted antidepressants, environmental enrichment and adrenalectomy are beneficial for reversing stress-induced changes in behaviour and have been shown to do so in a neurogenesis-dependant manner. In addition, stress and antidepressants can affect hippocampal neurogenesis, preferentially in the ventral hippocampus. Together, these data show that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may play a role in the neuroendocrine and behavioural responses to stress, although it is not yet fully clear under which circumstances neurogenesis promotes resilience or susceptibility to stress. It will be important that future studies carefully examine how adult hippocampal neurogenesis can contribute to stress resilience/susceptibility so that it may be appropriately exploited for the development of new and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 443 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Unknown 436 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 95 21%
Student > Bachelor 71 16%
Student > Master 54 12%
Researcher 50 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 5%
Other 68 15%
Unknown 84 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 116 26%
Psychology 64 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 6%
Other 41 9%
Unknown 99 22%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2020.
All research outputs
#2,810,856
of 25,371,288 outputs
Outputs from Neurobiology of Stress
#113
of 456 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,836
of 368,878 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neurobiology of Stress
#6
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,371,288 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 456 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 368,878 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.