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Antibiotics that target mitochondria effectively eradicate cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: Treating cancer like an infectious disease

Overview of attention for article published in Oncotarget, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
66 X users
patent
22 patents
facebook
10 Facebook pages
googleplus
6 Google+ users
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

dimensions_citation
400 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
519 Mendeley
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Title
Antibiotics that target mitochondria effectively eradicate cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: Treating cancer like an infectious disease
Published in
Oncotarget, January 2015
DOI 10.18632/oncotarget.3174
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca Lamb, Bela Ozsvari, Camilla L. Lisanti, Herbert B. Tanowitz, Anthony Howell, Ubaldo E. Martinez-Outschoorn, Federica Sotgia, Michael P. Lisanti

Abstract

Here, we propose a new strategy for the treatment of early cancerous lesions and advanced metastatic disease, via the selective targeting of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a.k.a., tumor-initiating cells (TICs). We searched for a global phenotypic characteristic that was highly conserved among cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types, to provide a mutation-independent approach to cancer therapy. This would allow us to target cancer stem cells, effectively treating cancer as a single disease of "stemness", independently of the tumor tissue type. Using this approach, we identified a conserved phenotypic weak point - a strict dependence on mitochondrial biogenesis for the clonal expansion and survival of cancer stem cells. Interestingly, several classes of FDA-approved antibiotics inhibit mitochondrial biogenesis as a known "side-effect", which could be harnessed instead as a "therapeutic effect". Based on this analysis, we now show that 4-to-5 different classes of FDA-approved drugs can be used to eradicate cancer stem cells, in 12 different cancer cell lines, across 8 different tumor types (breast, DCIS, ovarian, prostate, lung, pancreatic, melanoma, and glioblastoma (brain)). These five classes of mitochondrially-targeted antibiotics include: the erythromycins, the tetracyclines, the glycylcyclines, an anti-parasitic drug, and chloramphenicol. Functional data are presented for one antibiotic in each drug class: azithromycin, doxycycline, tigecycline, pyrvinium pamoate, as well as chloramphenicol, as proof-of-concept. Importantly, many of these drugs are non-toxic for normal cells, likely reducing the side effects of anti-cancer therapy. Thus, we now propose to treat cancer like an infectious disease, by repurposing FDA-approved antibiotics for anti-cancer therapy, across multiple tumor types. These drug classes should also be considered for prevention studies, specifically focused on the prevention of tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Finally, recent clinical trials with doxycycline and azithromycin (intended to target cancer-associated infections, but not cancer cells) have already shown positive therapeutic effects in cancer patients, although their ability to eradicate cancer stem cells was not yet appreciated.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 66 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 519 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 498 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 105 20%
Researcher 95 18%
Student > Master 66 13%
Student > Bachelor 62 12%
Other 29 6%
Other 78 15%
Unknown 84 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 122 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 112 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 76 15%
Chemistry 30 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 15 3%
Other 60 12%
Unknown 104 20%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 164. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2024.
All research outputs
#261,113
of 26,262,977 outputs
Outputs from Oncotarget
#72
of 14,287 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,911
of 362,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oncotarget
#1
of 365 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,262,977 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,287 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 362,745 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 365 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.