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Ontogenetic changes in tracheal structure facilitate deep dives and cold water foraging in adult leatherback sea turtles

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Biology, October 2009
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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1 X user
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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15 Dimensions

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93 Mendeley
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Title
Ontogenetic changes in tracheal structure facilitate deep dives and cold water foraging in adult leatherback sea turtles
Published in
Journal of Experimental Biology, October 2009
DOI 10.1242/jeb.034991
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Davenport, John Fraher, Ed Fitzgerald, Patrick McLaughlin, Tom Doyle, Luke Harman, Tracy Cuffe, Peter Dockery

Abstract

Adult leatherbacks are large animals (300-500 kg), overlapping in size with marine pinniped and cetacean species. Unlike marine mammals, they start their aquatic life as 40-50 g hatchlings, so undergo a 10,000-fold increase in body mass during independent existence. Hatchlings are limited to the tropics and near-surface water. Adults, obligate predators on gelatinous plankton, encounter cold water at depth (<1280 m) or high latitude and are gigantotherms that maintain elevated core body temperatures in cold water. This study shows that there are great ontogenetic changes in tracheal structure related to diving and exposure to cold. Hatchling leatherbacks have a conventional reptilian tracheal structure with circular cartilaginous rings interspersed with extensive connective tissue. The adult trachea is an almost continuous ellipsoidal cartilaginous tube composed of interlocking plates, and will collapse easily in the upper part of the water column during dives, thus avoiding pressure-related structural and physiological problems. It is lined with an extensive, dense erectile vascular plexus that will warm and humidify cold inspired air and possibly retain heat on expiration. A sub-luminal lymphatic plexus is also present. Mammals and birds have independently evolved nasal turbinates to fulfil such a respiratory thermocontrol function; for them, turbinates are regarded as diagnostic of endothermy. This is the first demonstration of a turbinate equivalent in a living reptile.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 91 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 16%
Student > Master 12 13%
Other 5 5%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 14 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 40%
Environmental Science 17 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 4%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 16 17%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2022.
All research outputs
#2,655,413
of 25,371,288 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Biology
#1,603
of 9,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,835
of 106,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Biology
#6
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,371,288 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,327 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 106,162 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.