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The impact of stillbirth on bereaved parents: A qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
73 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of stillbirth on bereaved parents: A qualitative study
Published in
PLOS ONE, January 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0191635
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Nuzum, Sarah Meaney, Keelin O’Donoghue

Abstract

To explore the lived experiences and personal impact of stillbirth on bereaved parents. Semi-structured in-depth interviews analysed by Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) on a purposive sample of parents of twelve babies born following fetal death at a tertiary university maternity hospital in Ireland with a birth rate of c8,500 per annum and a stillbirth rate of 4.6/1000. Stillbirth had a profound and enduring impact on bereaved parents. Four superordinate themes relating to the human impact of stillbirth emerged from the data: maintaining hope, importance of the personhood of the baby, protective care and relationships (personal and professional). Bereaved parents recalled in vivid detail their experiences of care following diagnosis of stillbirth and their subsequent care. The time between diagnosis of a life-limiting anomaly or stillbirth and delivery is highlighted as important for parents as they find meaning in their loss. The impact of stillbirth on bereaved parents is immense and how parents are cared for is recalled in precise detail as they revisit their experience. Building on existing literature, these data bring to light the depth of personal experience and impact of stillbirth for parents and provides medical professionals with valuable insights to inform their care of bereaved parents and the importance of clear and sensitive communication.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 73 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 125 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 18%
Student > Bachelor 22 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Researcher 10 8%
Other 18 14%
Unknown 29 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 28 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 17%
Psychology 16 13%
Social Sciences 9 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Other 16 13%
Unknown 32 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 86. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 October 2021.
All research outputs
#362,311
of 20,983,497 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#5,479
of 179,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,442
of 397,545 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#130
of 4,690 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,983,497 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 179,703 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,545 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,690 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.