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Convergence of soil nitrogen isotopes across global climate gradients

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
202 Mendeley
Title
Convergence of soil nitrogen isotopes across global climate gradients
Published in
Scientific Reports, February 2015
DOI 10.1038/srep08280
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph M. Craine, Andrew J. Elmore, Lixin Wang, Laurent Augusto, W. Troy Baisden, E. N. J. Brookshire, Michael D. Cramer, Niles J. Hasselquist, Erik A. Hobbie, Ansgar Kahmen, Keisuke Koba, J. Marty Kranabetter, Michelle C. Mack, Erika Marin-Spiotta, Jordan R. Mayor, Kendra K. McLauchlan, Anders Michelsen, Gabriela B. Nardoto, Rafael S. Oliveira, Steven S. Perakis, Pablo L. Peri, Carlos A. Quesada, Andreas Richter, Louis A. Schipper, Bryan A. Stevenson, Benjamin L. Turner, Ricardo A. G. Viani, Wolfgang Wanek, Bernd Zeller

Abstract

Quantifying global patterns of terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycling is central to predicting future patterns of primary productivity, carbon sequestration, nutrient fluxes to aquatic systems, and climate forcing. With limited direct measures of soil N cycling at the global scale, syntheses of the (15)N:(14)N ratio of soil organic matter across climate gradients provide key insights into understanding global patterns of N cycling. In synthesizing data from over 6000 soil samples, we show strong global relationships among soil N isotopes, mean annual temperature (MAT), mean annual precipitation (MAP), and the concentrations of organic carbon and clay in soil. In both hot ecosystems and dry ecosystems, soil organic matter was more enriched in (15)N than in corresponding cold ecosystems or wet ecosystems. Below a MAT of 9.8°C, soil δ(15)N was invariant with MAT. At the global scale, soil organic C concentrations also declined with increasing MAT and decreasing MAP. After standardizing for variation among mineral soils in soil C and clay concentrations, soil δ(15)N showed no consistent trends across global climate and latitudinal gradients. Our analyses could place new constraints on interpretations of patterns of ecosystem N cycling and global budgets of gaseous N loss.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 202 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
Estonia 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 189 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 21%
Researcher 42 21%
Student > Master 31 15%
Student > Bachelor 17 8%
Professor 16 8%
Other 34 17%
Unknown 19 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 69 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 62 31%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 33 16%
Social Sciences 3 1%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 <1%
Other 5 2%
Unknown 28 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2018.
All research outputs
#1,974,182
of 13,865,625 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#15,472
of 69,795 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,404
of 280,874 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#2
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,865,625 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 69,795 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,874 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.