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Enhanced understanding of ectoparasite–host trophic linkages on coral reefs through stable isotope analysis

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife, April 2015
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4 tweeters

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Title
Enhanced understanding of ectoparasite–host trophic linkages on coral reefs through stable isotope analysis
Published in
International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife, April 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.ijppaw.2015.01.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanda W.J. Demopoulos, Paul C. Sikkel

Abstract

Parasitism, although the most common type of ecological interaction, is usually ignored in food web models and studies of trophic connectivity. Stable isotope analysis is widely used in assessing the flow of energy in ecological communities and thus is a potentially valuable tool in understanding the cryptic trophic relationships mediated by parasites. In an effort to assess the utility of stable isotope analysis in understanding the role of parasites in complex coral-reef trophic systems, we performed stable isotope analysis on three common Caribbean reef fish hosts and two kinds of ectoparasitic isopods: temporarily parasitic gnathiids (Gnathia marleyi) and permanently parasitic cymothoids (Anilocra). To further track the transfer of fish-derived carbon (energy) from parasites to parasite consumers, gnathiids from host fish were also fed to captive Pederson shrimp (Ancylomenes pedersoni) for at least 1 month. Parasitic isopods had δ(13)C and δ(15)N values similar to their host, comparable with results from the small number of other host-parasite studies that have employed stable isotopes. Adult gnathiids were enriched in (15)N and depleted in (13)C relative to juvenile gnathiids, providing insights into the potential isotopic fractionation associated with blood-meal assimilation and subsequent metamorphosis. Gnathiid-fed Pedersen shrimp also had δ(13)C values consistent with their food source and enriched in (15)N as predicted due to trophic fractionation. These results further indicate that stable isotopes can be an effective tool in deciphering cryptic feeding relationships involving parasites and their consumers, and the role of parasites and cleaners in carbon transfer in coral-reef ecosystems specifically.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Kenya 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 60 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 30%
Student > Master 8 13%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Other 6 10%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 49%
Environmental Science 12 19%
Chemistry 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2015.
All research outputs
#11,727,976
of 19,208,681 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife
#307
of 519 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,713
of 307,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,208,681 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 519 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 307,628 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them