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Wildlife-vehicle collisions in Lanzarote Biosphere Reserve, Canary Islands

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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16 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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62 Mendeley
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Title
Wildlife-vehicle collisions in Lanzarote Biosphere Reserve, Canary Islands
Published in
PLOS ONE, March 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0192731
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gustavo Tejera, Beneharo Rodríguez, Carlos Armas, Airam Rodríguez

Abstract

Insular wildlife is more prone to extinction than their mainland relatives. Thus, a basic understanding of non-natural mortality sources is the first step in the development of conservation management plans. The Canary Islands are an important tourist destination due to their unique climate and rich scenery and biodiversity. During the last few decades, there has been significant development of urban areas and busy road networks. However, there have been no studies describing the effects of road mortality on wildlife in this archipelago. We describe the temporal and spatial patterns of wildlife roadkill in Lanzarote (UNESCO Biosphere Reserve), using counts from cars for an entire annual cycle. A total of 666 roadkills were recorded (monthly average of 0.09 birds/km and 0.14 mammals/km) comprising at least 37 species including native birds and introduced mammals. Seasonal abundance, richness and diversity of roadkills showed a high peak during summer months for both mammals and birds. GLMs indicated that accidents (including birds and mammals) have a higher probability of occurrence close to houses and on roads with high speed limits. When analysed separately, mammal kills occurred in sectors with high speed limits, close to houses and in areas surrounded by exotic bushes, while bird roadkills appeared in road sectors with high speed limits, close to houses and low traffic volume. Our findings highlight that roads are a potential threat to native birds in the eastern Canary Islands. Detailed studies on the local population dynamics of highly affected species, such as the Houbara Bustard, Eurasian Stone Curlew, Barn Owl or Southern Shrike, are urgently needed to determine whether these levels of road mortality are sustainable.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 62 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 19%
Student > Master 11 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Researcher 9 15%
Other 3 5%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 12 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 32%
Environmental Science 12 19%
Engineering 6 10%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 17 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2018.
All research outputs
#2,157,136
of 17,634,657 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#29,167
of 165,978 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,272
of 288,161 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#692
of 2,759 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,634,657 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 165,978 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,161 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,759 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.