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Is dietary glycemic load associated with liver fibrosis in hepatitis C?

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrición Hospitalaria, January 2018
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Title
Is dietary glycemic load associated with liver fibrosis in hepatitis C?
Published in
Nutrición Hospitalaria, January 2018
DOI 10.20960/nh.1172
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juliana Paula Bruch

Abstract

Occidental diet and metabolic profile seems to increase hepatic fibrosis (HF) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but there is scarce information about the diet components and their role in this setting. This study aims to evaluate the dietary intake, metabolic profile, presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic HCV infection according to the presence of fibrosis. Cross-sectional study which 58 patients with HCV infection without active antiviral therapy and non-cirrhotic were assessed. All patients were subjected to clinical, laboratorial and dietary evaluation, and classified according to the METAVIR score. Patients were divided as the presence of hepatic fibrosis. In this sample, fifty-five percent of patients were females, the average age was 51.6 ± 9.7 years, and 79.3% were carriers of HCV genotype 1. Patients with HF presented higher energy, and fat intake as well as higher glycemic load of meals in comparison to those without HF. Patients with HF presented higher systolic and diastolic arterial pressure and higher levels of insulin. In conclusion, patients with HF had higher total daily energy and total fat intakes, and worse metabolic profile, characterized by a higher insulin resistance and blood pressure.

Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 1 50%
Student > Master 1 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 50%
Unspecified 1 50%