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Cross-sectional association of dietary water intakes and sources, and adiposity: National Adult Nutrition Survey, the Republic of Ireland

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, March 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

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Title
Cross-sectional association of dietary water intakes and sources, and adiposity: National Adult Nutrition Survey, the Republic of Ireland
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, March 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00394-018-1635-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janette Walton, Laura O’Connor, Albert Flynn

Abstract

Drinking (plain) water intake has been associated with weight loss and reducing energy intake in intervention trials. In free-living populations, replacing other beverages with drinking water is associated with reduced obesity risk. However, the association of total water intake and its sources, and body fat distribution remain unevaluated. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate total water intake and its sources and the association with anthropometric measures. Cross-sectional study of 1500 adults aged 18-90 years (Irish National Adult Nutrition Survey, 2008-2010). Total water intake and its sources were estimated using food records. Associations of total water, drinking water, beverage moisture and food moisture intakes split by tertile, and BMI (kg/m2), waist circumference (cm), and bio-impedance derived body fat (%) were evaluated using covariate-adjusted linear regression analyses including adjustment for energy intake and energy expenditure. Higher consumption of total water was associated with lower waist circumference [β-coefficient (95% CI), p trend, tertile 3 versus tertile 1: - 2.19 (- 4.06, - 0.32), 0.036], but not BMI [- 0.44 (- 1.16, 0.28), 0.336] or body fat [- 0.87 (- 1.91, 0.17), 0.146]. Higher consumption of drinking water and food moisture were associated with lower BMI [- 0.65 (- 1.30, - 0.01), 0.027; - 0.64 (- 1.41, - 0.13), 0.014, respectively], body fat [- 1.51 (- 2.43, - 0.59), 0.001; - 1.00 (- 2.12, - 0.12), 0.001], and waist circumference [- 2.83 (- 4.51, - 1.16), < 0.001; - 1.84 (- 3.86, - 0.19), 0.082]. Beverage moisture was not associated with any of the anthropometric measurements. Consumption of drinking water and food moisture and not total water or beverage moisture were inversely associated with adiposity, independent of energy intake and expenditure. Advice encouraging drinking water and food moisture intake may be beneficial in addition to energy balance advice, in combating obesity.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 13%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Lecturer 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 6%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 18 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Psychology 3 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 20 42%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2021.
All research outputs
#6,445,816
of 23,031,582 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#1,098
of 2,407 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,975
of 329,870 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#37
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,031,582 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,407 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,870 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.