Randomized Trial of Peanut Consumption in Infants at Risk for Peanut Allergy

Overview of attention for article published in New England Journal of Medicine, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 18,857)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

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18 Mendeley
Title
Randomized Trial of Peanut Consumption in Infants at Risk for Peanut Allergy
Published in
New England Journal of Medicine, February 2015
DOI 10.1056/nejmoa1414850
Pubmed ID
Authors

George Du Toit, Graham Roberts, Peter H Sayre, Henry T Bahnson, Suzana Radulovic, Alexandra F Santos, Helen A Brough, Deborah Phippard, Monica Basting, Mary Feeney, Victor Turcanu, Michelle L Sever, Margarita Gomez Lorenzo, Marshall Plaut, Gideon Lack, Du Toit G, Roberts G, Sayre PH, Bahnson HT, Radulovic S, Santos AF, Brough HA, Phippard D, Basting M, Feeney M, Turcanu V, Sever ML, Gomez Lorenzo M, Plaut M, Lack G, Du Toit, George, Peter H. Sayre, Henry T. Bahnson, Alexandra F. Santos, Helen A. Brough, Michelle L. Sever, for the LEAP Study Team*, Roberts, Graham, Sayre, Peter H., Bahnson, Henry T., Radulovic, Suzana, Santos, Alexandra F., Brough, Helen A., Phippard, Deborah, Basting, Monica, Feeney, Mary, Turcanu, Victor, Sever, Michelle L., Gomez Lorenzo, Margarita, Plaut, Marshall, Lack, Gideon

Abstract

Background The prevalence of peanut allergy among children in Western countries has doubled in the past 10 years, and peanut allergy is becoming apparent in Africa and Asia. We evaluated strategies of peanut consumption and avoidance to determine which strategy is most effective in preventing the development of peanut allergy in infants at high risk for the allergy. Methods We randomly assigned 640 infants with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both to consume or avoid peanuts until 60 months of age. Participants, who were at least 4 months but younger than 11 months of age at randomization, were assigned to separate study cohorts on the basis of preexisting sensitivity to peanut extract, which was determined with the use of a skin-prick test - one consisting of participants with no measurable wheal after testing and the other consisting of those with a wheal measuring 1 to 4 mm in diameter. The primary outcome, which was assessed independently in each cohort, was the proportion of participants with peanut allergy at 60 months of age. Results Among the 530 infants in the intention-to-treat population who initially had negative results on the skin-prick test, the prevalence of peanut allergy at 60 months of age was 13.7% in the avoidance group and 1.9% in the consumption group (P<0.001). Among the 98 participants in the intention-to-treat population who initially had positive test results, the prevalence of peanut allergy was 35.3% in the avoidance group and 10.6% in the consumption group (P=0.004). There was no significant between-group difference in the incidence of serious adverse events. Increases in levels of peanut-specific IgG4 antibody occurred predominantly in the consumption group; a greater percentage of participants in the avoidance group had elevated titers of peanut-specific IgE antibody. A larger wheal on the skin-prick test and a lower ratio of peanut-specific IgG4:IgE were associated with peanut allergy. Conclusions The early introduction of peanuts significantly decreased the frequency of the development of peanut allergy among children at high risk for this allergy and modulated immune responses to peanuts. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00329784 .).

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 17 94%
Canada 4 22%
Spain 4 22%
Netherlands 3 17%
Japan 3 17%
France 2 11%
Denmark 2 11%
Germany 1 6%
Slovenia 1 6%
Other 12 67%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 97 539%
Other 75 417%
Student > Master 74 411%
Student > Bachelor 71 394%
Student > Ph. D. Student 58 322%
Other 136 756%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 311 1728%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 96 533%
Nursing and Health Professions 28 156%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 72%
Immunology and Microbiology 13 72%
Other 50 278%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1999. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2017.
All research outputs
#229
of 7,423,471 outputs
Outputs from New England Journal of Medicine
#13
of 18,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9
of 202,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New England Journal of Medicine
#1
of 361 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,423,471 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 18,857 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 43.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,317 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 361 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.