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Skeletal muscle protein metabolism in the elderly: Interventions to counteract the 'anabolic resistance' of ageing

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
78 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

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204 Dimensions

Readers on

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383 Mendeley
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Title
Skeletal muscle protein metabolism in the elderly: Interventions to counteract the 'anabolic resistance' of ageing
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1743-7075-8-68
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leigh Breen, Stuart M Phillips

Abstract

Age-related muscle wasting (sarcopenia) is accompanied by a loss of strength which can compromise the functional abilities of the elderly. Muscle proteins are in a dynamic equilibrium between their respective rates of synthesis and breakdown. It has been suggested that age-related sarcopenia is due to: i) elevated basal-fasted rates of muscle protein breakdown, ii) a reduction in basal muscle protein synthesis (MPS), or iii) a combination of the two factors. However, basal rates of muscle protein synthesis and breakdown are unchanged with advancing healthy age. Instead, it appears that the muscles of the elderly are resistant to normally robust anabolic stimuli such as amino acids and resistance exercise. Ageing muscle is less sensitive to lower doses of amino acids than the young and may require higher quantities of protein to acutely stimulate equivalent muscle protein synthesis above rest and accrue muscle proteins. With regard to dietary protein recommendations, emerging evidence suggests that the elderly may need to distribute protein intake evenly throughout the day, so as to promote an optimal per meal stimulation of MPS. The branched-chain amino acid leucine is thought to play a central role in mediating mRNA translation for MPS, and the elderly should ensure sufficient leucine is provided with dietary protein intake. With regards to physical activity, lower, than previously realized, intensity high-volume resistance exercise can stimulate a robust muscle protein synthetic response similar to traditional high-intensity low volume training, which may be beneficial for older adults. Resistance exercise combined with amino acid ingestion elicits the greatest anabolic response and may assist elderly in producing a 'youthful' muscle protein synthetic response provided sufficient protein is ingested following exercise.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 78 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 383 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 368 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 81 21%
Student > Bachelor 66 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 15%
Researcher 36 9%
Other 29 8%
Other 83 22%
Unknown 32 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 84 22%
Sports and Recreations 71 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 66 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 45 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 35 9%
Other 34 9%
Unknown 48 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 59. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2019.
All research outputs
#309,911
of 13,976,935 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#70
of 703 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,590
of 98,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,976,935 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 703 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 98,741 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them