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Associations of Y chromosomal haplogroups with cardiometabolic risk factors and subclinical vascular measures in males during childhood and adolescence

Overview of attention for article published in Atherosclerosis (00219150), April 2018
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Title
Associations of Y chromosomal haplogroups with cardiometabolic risk factors and subclinical vascular measures in males during childhood and adolescence
Published in
Atherosclerosis (00219150), April 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2018.04.027
Pubmed ID
Authors

Linda M. O'Keeffe, Laura D. Howe, Abigail Fraser, Alun D. Hughes, Kaitlin H. Wade, Emma L. Anderson, Debbie A. Lawlor, A. Mesut Erzurumluoglu, George Davey-Smith, Santiago Rodriguez, Evie Stergiakouli

Abstract

Males have greater cardiometabolic risk than females, though the reasons for this are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to examine the association between common Y chromosomal haplogroups and cardiometabolic risk during early life. In a British birth cohort, we examined the association of Y chromosomal haplogroups with trajectories of cardiometabolic risk factors from birth to 18 years and with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid intima media thickness and left ventricular mass index at age 18. Haplogroups were grouped according to their phylogenetic relatedness into categories of R, I, E, J, G and all other haplogroups combined (T, Q, H, L, C, N and O). Risk factors included BMI, fat and lean mass, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, pulse rate, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), non-HDL-c and c-reactive protein. Analyses were performed using multilevel models and linear regression, as appropriate. Y chromosomal haplogroups were not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factors from birth to 18 years. For example, at age 18, the difference in SBP comparing each haplogroup with haplogroup R was -0.39 mmHg (95% Confidence Interval (CI): -0.75, 1.54) for haplogroup I, 2.56 mmHg (95% CI: -0.76, 5.89) for haplogroup E, -0.02 mmHg (95% CI: -2.87, 2.83) for haplogroup J, 1.28 mmHg (95% CI: -4.70, 2.13) for haplogroup G and -2.75 mmHg (95% CI: -6.38, 0.88) for all other haplogroups combined. Common Y chromosomal haplogroups are not associated with cardiometabolic risk factors during childhood and adolescence or with subclinical cardiovascular measures at age 18.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 20%
Student > Master 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 21 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Computer Science 3 6%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 23 43%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2018.
All research outputs
#17,284,203
of 26,161,782 outputs
Outputs from Atherosclerosis (00219150)
#4,202
of 5,693 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#212,456
of 343,539 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Atherosclerosis (00219150)
#45
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,161,782 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,693 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,539 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.