↓ Skip to main content

Strategies of Functional Foods Promote Sleep in Human Being

Overview of attention for article published in Current Signal Transduction Therapy, April 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Strategies of Functional Foods Promote Sleep in Human Being
Published in
Current Signal Transduction Therapy, April 2015
DOI 10.2174/1574362410666150205165504
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yawen Zeng, Jiazhen Yang, Juan Du, Xiaoying Pu, Xiaomen Yang, Shuming Yang, Tao Yang

Abstract

Sleep is a vital segment of life, however, the mechanisms of diet promoting sleep are unclear and are the focus of research. Insomnia is a general sleep disorder and functional foods are known to play a key role in the prevention of insomnia. A number of studies have demonstrated that major insomnia risk factors in human being are less functional foods in dietary. There are higher functional components in functional foods promoting sleep, including tryptophan, GABA, calcium, potassium, melatonin, pyridoxine, L-ornithine and hexadecanoic acid; but wake-promoting neurochemical factors include serotonin, noradrenalin, acetylcholine, histamine, orexin and so on. The factors promoting sleep in human being are the functional foods include barley grass powder, whole grains, maca, panax, Lingzhi, asparagus powder, lettuce, cherry, kiwifruits, walnut, schisandra wine, and milk; Barley grass powder with higher GABA and calcium, as well as potassium is the most ideal functional food promoting sleep, however, the sleep duration for modern humans is associated with food structure of ancient humans. In this review, we put forward possible mechanisms of functional components in foods promoting sleep. Although there is clear relevance between sleep and diet, their molecular mechanisms need to be studied further.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 87 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 27 30%
Student > Master 15 17%
Researcher 11 12%
Student > Postgraduate 10 11%
Other 5 6%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 10 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 11 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 55. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2020.
All research outputs
#345,360
of 14,222,420 outputs
Outputs from Current Signal Transduction Therapy
#1
of 17 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,983
of 234,930 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Signal Transduction Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,222,420 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one scored the same or higher as 16 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,930 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them