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The sedentary office: an expert statement on the growing case for change towards better health and productivity

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Sports Medicine, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 5,971)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
99 news outlets
blogs
10 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
424 tweeters
patent
6 patents
facebook
46 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
14 Google+ users
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
286 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
485 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The sedentary office: an expert statement on the growing case for change towards better health and productivity
Published in
British Journal of Sports Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2015-094618
Pubmed ID
Authors

John P Buckley, Alan Hedge, Thomas Yates, Robert J Copeland, Michael Loosemore, Mark Hamer, Gavin Bradley, David W Dunstan

Abstract

An international group of experts was invited by Public Health England and a UK community interest company (Active Working CIC) to provide guidelines for employers to promote the avoidance of prolonged periods of sedentary work. The set of recommendations was developed from the totality of the current evidence, including long-term epidemiological studies and interventional studies of getting workers to stand and/or move more frequently. The evidence was ranked in quality using the four levels of the American College of Sports Medicine. The derived guidance is as follows: for those occupations which are predominantly desk based, workers should aim to initially progress towards accumulating 2 h/day of standing and light activity (light walking) during working hours, eventually progressing to a total accumulation of 4 h/day (prorated to part-time hours). To achieve this, seated-based work should be regularly broken up with standing-based work, the use of sit-stand desks, or the taking of short active standing breaks. Along with other health promotion goals (improved nutrition, reducing alcohol, smoking and stress), companies should also promote among their staff that prolonged sitting, aggregated from work and in leisure time, may significantly and independently increase the risk of cardiometabolic diseases and premature mortality. It is appreciated that these recommendations should be interpreted in relation to the evidence from which they were derived, largely observational and retrospective studies, or short-term interventional studies showing acute cardiometabolic changes. While longer term intervention studies are required, the level of consistent evidence accumulated to date, and the public health context of rising chronic diseases, suggest initial guidelines are justified. We hope these guidelines stimulate future research, and that greater precision will be possible within future iterations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 424 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 485 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 477 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 107 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 59 12%
Student > Bachelor 55 11%
Researcher 44 9%
Other 30 6%
Other 109 22%
Unknown 81 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 78 16%
Sports and Recreations 61 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 55 11%
Psychology 37 8%
Engineering 29 6%
Other 119 25%
Unknown 106 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1213. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2022.
All research outputs
#7,892
of 21,110,276 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Sports Medicine
#29
of 5,971 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55
of 250,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Sports Medicine
#1
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,110,276 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,971 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 58.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,215 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.