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Preserved insulin sensitivity predicts metabolically healthy obese phenotype in children and adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Pediatrics, July 2015
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Title
Preserved insulin sensitivity predicts metabolically healthy obese phenotype in children and adolescents
Published in
European Journal of Pediatrics, July 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00431-015-2587-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rade Vukovic, Tatjana Milenkovic, Katarina Mitrovic, Sladjana Todorovic, Ljiljana Plavsic, Ana Vukovic, Dragan Zdravkovic

Abstract

Available data on metabolically healthy obese (MHO) phenotype in children suggest that gender, puberty, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, and other laboratory predictors have a role in distinguishing these children from metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) youth. The goal of this study was to identify predictors of MHO phenotype and to analyze glucose and insulin metabolism during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in MHO children. OGTT was performed in 244 obese children and adolescents aged 4.6-18.9 years. Subjects were classified as MHO in case of no fulfilled criterion of metabolic syndrome except anthropometry or as MUO (≥2 fulfilled criteria). Among the subjects, 21.7 % had MHO phenotype, and they were more likely to be female, younger, and in earlier stages of pubertal development, with lower degree of abdominal obesity. Insulin resistance was the only independent laboratory predictor of MUO phenotype (OR 1.59, CI 1.13-2.25), with 82 % sensitivity and 60 % specificity for diagnosing MUO using HOMA-IR cutoff point of ≥2.85. Although no significant differences were observed in glucose regulation, MUO children had higher insulin demand throughout OGTT, with 1.53 times higher total insulin secretion. Further research is needed to investigate the possibility of targeted treatment of insulin resistance to minimize pubertal cross-over to MUO in obese children. What is Known: • Substantial proportion of the obese youth (21-68 %) displays a metabolically healthy (MHO) phenotype. • Gender, puberty, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, and lower levels of uric acid and transaminases have a possible role in distinguishing MHO from metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) children. What is New: • Insulin resistance was found to be the only significant laboratory predictor of MUO when adjusted for gender, puberty, and the degree of abdominal obesity. • Besides basal insulin resistance, MUO children were found to have a significantly higher insulin secretion throughout OGTT in order to maintain glucose homeostasis.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 74 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Master 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Other 6 8%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 20 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Sports and Recreations 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 25 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2015.
All research outputs
#15,705,613
of 23,940,793 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Pediatrics
#2,822
of 3,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,845
of 265,572 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Pediatrics
#22
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,940,793 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,987 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,572 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.