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Is blended learning and problem-based learning course design suited to develop future public health leaders? An explorative European study

Overview of attention for article published in Public Health Reviews, June 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 X users

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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149 Mendeley
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Title
Is blended learning and problem-based learning course design suited to develop future public health leaders? An explorative European study
Published in
Public Health Reviews, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40985-018-0090-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen D. Könings, Nynke de Jong, Christa Lohrmann, Linas Sumskas, Tony Smith, Stephen J. O’Connor, Ingrid A. E. Spanjers, Jeroen J. G. Van Merriënboer, Katarzyna Czabanowska

Abstract

Public health leaders are confronted with complex problems, and developing effective leadership competencies is essential. The teaching of leadership is still not common in public health training programs around the world. A reconceptualization of professional training is needed and can benefit from innovative educational approaches. Our aim was to explore learners' perceptions of the effectiveness and appeal of a public health leadership course using problem-based, blended learning methods that used virtual learning environment technologies. In this cross-sectional evaluative study, the Self-Assessment Instrument of Competencies for Public Health Leaders was administered before and after an online, blended-learning, problem-based (PBL) leadership course. An evaluation questionnaire was also used to measure perceptions of blended learning, problem-based learning, and tutor functioning among 19 public health professionals from The Netherlands (n = 8), Lithuania (n = 5), and Austria (n = 6).Participants showed overall satisfaction and knowledge gains related to public health leadership competencies in six of eight measured areas, especially Political Leadership and Systems Thinking. Some perceptions of blended learning and PBL varied between the institutions. This might have been caused by lack of experience of the educational approaches, differing professional backgrounds, inexperience of communicating in the online setting, and different expectations towards the course. Blended, problem-based learning might be an effective way to develop leadership competencies among public health professionals in international and interdisciplinary context.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 149 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Lecturer 10 7%
Student > Bachelor 10 7%
Other 31 21%
Unknown 60 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 14%
Social Sciences 12 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 7%
Engineering 8 5%
Psychology 7 5%
Other 28 19%
Unknown 62 42%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2018.
All research outputs
#4,241,329
of 25,382,440 outputs
Outputs from Public Health Reviews
#115
of 278 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,851
of 342,877 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Public Health Reviews
#10
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,382,440 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 278 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 342,877 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.