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Effect of nasal balloon autoinflation in children with otitis media with effusion in primary care: an open randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Medical Association Journal, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
46 X users
facebook
6 Facebook pages
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of nasal balloon autoinflation in children with otitis media with effusion in primary care: an open randomized controlled trial
Published in
Canadian Medical Association Journal, July 2015
DOI 10.1503/cmaj.141608
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ian Williamson, Jane Vennik, Anthony Harnden, Merryn Voysey, Rafael Perera, Sadie Kelly, Guiqing Yao, James Raftery, David Mant, Paul Little

Abstract

Otitis media with effusion is a common problem that lacks an evidence-based nonsurgical treatment option. We assessed the clinical effectiveness of treatment with a nasal balloon device in a primary care setting. We conducted an open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial set in 43 family practices in the United Kingdom. Children aged 4-11 years with a recent history of ear symptoms and otitis media with effusion in 1 or both ears, confirmed by tympanometry, were allocated to receive either autoinflation 3 times daily for 1-3 months plus usual care or usual care alone. Clearance of middle-ear fluid at 1 and 3 months was assessed by experts masked to allocation. Of 320 children enrolled, those receiving autoinflation were more likely than controls to have normal tympanograms at 1 month (47.3% [62/131] v. 35.6% [47/132]; adjusted relative risk [RR] 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99 to 1.88) and at 3 months (49.6% [62/125] v. 38.3% [46/120]; adjusted RR 1.37, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.83; number needed to treat = 9). Autoinflation produced greater improvements in earrelated quality of life (adjusted between-group difference in change from baseline in OMQ-14 [an ear-related measure of quality of life] score -0.42, 95% CI -0.63 to -0.22). Compliance was 89% at 1 month and 80% at 3 months. Adverse events were mild, infrequent and comparable between groups. Autoinflation in children aged 4-11 years with otitis media with effusion is feasible in primary care and effective both in clearing effusions and improving symptoms and ear-related child and parent quality of life. ISRCTN, No. 55208702.

X Demographics

X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 86 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 11%
Student > Master 9 10%
Researcher 8 9%
Student > Postgraduate 6 7%
Other 14 16%
Unknown 25 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 44%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Psychology 3 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 29 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 179. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2017.
All research outputs
#234,237
of 26,150,897 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Medical Association Journal
#423
of 9,629 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,380
of 276,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Medical Association Journal
#5
of 120 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,150,897 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,629 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,090 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 120 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.