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Factors influencing the development of otitis media among Sicilian children affected by upper respiratory tract infections

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, July 2015
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Title
Factors influencing the development of otitis media among Sicilian children affected by upper respiratory tract infections
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, July 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.bjorl.2015.04.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesco Martines, Pietro Salvago, Sergio Ferrara, Giuseppe Messina, Marianna Mucia, Fulvio Plescia, Federico Sireci

Abstract

Upper respiratory tract infection is a nonspecific term used to describe an acute infection involving the nose, paranasal sinuses, pharynx and larynx. Upper respiratory tract infections in children are often associated with Eustachian tube dysfunction and complicated by otitis media, an inflammatory process within the middle ear. Environmental, epidemiologic and familial risk factors for otitis media (such as sex, socioeconomic and educational factors, smoke exposure, allergy or duration of breastfeeding) have been previously reported, but actually no data about their diffusion among Sicilian children with upper respiratory tract infections are available. To investigate the main risk factors for otitis media and their prevalence in Sicilian children with and without upper respiratory tract infections. A case-control study of 204 children with upper respiratory tract infections who developed otitis media during a 3 weeks monitoring period and 204 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Seventeen epidemiologically relevant features were inventoried by means of standardized questionnaires and skin tests were performed. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to examine the association between risk factors and occurrence of otitis media. Otitis media resulted strongly associated to large families, low parental educational attainment, schooling within the third years of life (p<0.05); children were more susceptible to develop otitis media in the presence of asthma, cough, laryngopharyngeal reflux disease, snoring and apnea (p<0.05). Allergy and urban localization increased the risk of otitis media in children exposed to smoke respectively of 166% and 277% (p<0.05); the joint effect of asthma and presence of pets in allergic population increased the risk of recurrence of 11%, while allergy, cough and runny nose together increased this risk of 74%. Upper respiratory tract infections and otitis media are common childhood diseases strongly associated with low parental educational attainment (p=0.0001), exposure to smoke (p=0.0001), indoor exposure to mold (p=0.0001), laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (p=0.0002) and the lack of breast-feeding (p=0.0014); an increased risk of otitis media recurrences was observed in the presence of allergy, persistent cough and runny nose (p=0.0001). The modification of the identified risk factors for otitis media should be recommended to realize a correct primary care intervention.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 135 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 19%
Student > Master 20 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 8%
Other 10 7%
Other 21 16%
Unknown 37 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 4%
Engineering 5 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 2%
Other 13 10%
Unknown 42 31%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2016.
All research outputs
#20,674,485
of 25,394,764 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
#503
of 728 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,672
of 275,772 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
#11
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,394,764 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 728 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,772 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.