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Views of parents regarding human papillomavirus vaccination: A systematic review and meta-ethnographic synthesis of qualitative literature

Overview of attention for article published in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, April 2019
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
32 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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112 Mendeley
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Title
Views of parents regarding human papillomavirus vaccination: A systematic review and meta-ethnographic synthesis of qualitative literature
Published in
Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, April 2019
DOI 10.1016/j.sapharm.2018.05.013
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Marshall, A. Fleming, A.C. Moore, L.J. Sahm

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract. Three prophylactic HPV vaccines are available for the prevention of HPV-related disease. Despite clinical success, immunisation rates remain sub-optimal. The purpose of this systematic review is to synthesise qualitative literature to achieve an understanding of the drivers and barriers to HPV vaccine acceptability and to determine targets for an intervention to improve vaccine uptake. The seven-step model of meta-ethnography described by Noblit and Hare was used. The quality of the studies was assessed using the CASP (Critical Appraisal Skills Programme) for qualitative research. The ENTREQ (Enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research) statement was used to guide reporting of results. Thirty-three studies were included in the final analysis, compiling the opinions of 1280 parents/guardians from 14 countries. Five key concepts that reflected the principal findings of studies were determined: is prevention better than cure; the fear of the unknown; limited knowledge and understanding; complex vaccination decisions and; parental responsibility. Third-order interpretations were developed and linked using a 'line of argument' to develop a conceptual model. The majority of parents are motivated to protect their children and prevent disease. The link to sexual intercourse associated with the HPV vaccine often complicates the vaccination decision. Vaccine manufacturers, national healthcare systems and healthcare providers can reinforce the importance of HPV immunisation and reiterate the rationale behind vaccination recommendations, by providing unambiguous information in a timely manner, transparently addressing parental concerns regarding vaccine safety and efficacy, whilst taking account of cultural and religious sensitivities and varying health literacy levels. In recent years, there has been a reduction in HPV vaccine uptake worldwide. Currently, there is a paucity of published qualitative studies addressing these new vaccine concerns. Therefore, such research is required to guide intervention development, to improve HPV vaccine uptake.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 112 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 22%
Unspecified 11 10%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Researcher 9 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 7%
Other 19 17%
Unknown 30 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 13%
Unspecified 11 10%
Social Sciences 10 9%
Psychology 7 6%
Other 19 17%
Unknown 34 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2019.
All research outputs
#1,171,314
of 18,166,797 outputs
Outputs from Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy
#64
of 1,253 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,729
of 288,685 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy
#1
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,166,797 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,253 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,685 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.